Blog – Psychology Educational Assistants - Resources for Psychology students at the University of St. Thomas.
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Regions Hospital Research Intern Program

Check out this new internship at Regions!

• Research interns support the Critical Care Research Center staff and investigators in conducting clinical trials within Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medicine, the Surgical Intensive Care Unit, the Trauma Program, Hospital Medicine and the Burn Center. Ideal candidates are interested in a career in medicine or the health sciences. Previous research and/or patient care experience is preferred.

• Key Duties: Screening subjects, consenting and enrolling patients, data collection, chart abstraction, abstract/manuscript preparation.

• Interns also have the opportunity to participate in unique educational experiences which in the past have included shadowing, cadaver and sim labs, ambulance ride-alongs, and CPR, EKG, and ultrasound training. • This is a 12 month, paid experience starting the first week of June.

• This is NOT a summer program. Hours are M-F 3:00PM-11:30PM and11:00PM- 7:30AM. Weekend (Saturday/Sunday shifts) are the same with the addition of a morning shift from 7:00AM-3:30PM. Interns must be able to work approximately 8 shifts per month, with 3 of the 8 shifts during the weekend. • We highly encourage gap year students to consider this opportunity.

More information: Flyers

Regions Research Intern Flyer 2017

InternRoadMap2017-18

Posted 5/2/17

EA Blog

Regions Hospital Critical Care Research Center Internship

The internship is a year-long, paid internship that starts in June. It’s at Regions Hospital in the Critical Care Research Center. It is a great opportunity for those who are looking to become nurses, clinical researchers, M.D.’s and Physician Assistants. It is an awesome way for those taking a gap year before applying for graduate school to gain experience. We mainly hire students who have just graduated since the hours are evenings and overnights with the additional day shift Saturday and Sunday and it is required that you work both types of shifts in order to get experience about what these types of shifts are like. We will occasionally hire students who are in their final year of school as well if they stand out in their resume and interview and have a schedule that allows them to accommodate these shifts. The shift times are 3pm-11:30pm (evening) and 11pm-7:30am (overnights), with the additional 7am-3:30pm (day) shift on weekends. The schedule is determined at our monthly intern meeting where we all meet and train on upcoming studies and get caught up with what’s going on in the department. Interns determine which shifts they can work based on their schedule that month. The shifts are spent mainly in the Emergency Department screening and enrolling patients in our various studies. We have studies in the Emergency Room, the ICUs and the Burn Center. You will learn how these studies work in and out and will be a great resource to the hospital staff when these patients come in. Sometimes there will be other work to do, such as data abstractions or literature reviews, and later in the internship there will be personal research projects to be worked on as well. We offer many learning and professional development opportunities, including ride-alongs with an Emergency Medicine Services physician, a cadaver lab, ability to observe minor Emergency Room procedures, CPR training, Violence Prevention training, and many others. If this sounds like something you are interested in, go to https://www.regionshospital.com/rh2/careers/index.html and search “Clinical Research Intern” (Job ID: 42974).

Regions Research Intern Flier 2017     InternRoadMap2017-18

*Ignore the details about when applications are open at the bottom of the Research Intern Flier!

 

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Spring 2017 Environmental Action Events

People’s Climate Solidarity March – MN

When: Saturday, April 29th 2:30-6

Join the People’s Climate March solidarity event in the Twin Cities.

The People’s Climate March (2.0) is happening to challenge the backwards and dangerous policies of the Trump Administration and the threat they pose to our climate and our communities.

This is a moment to bring the range of progressive social change movements together. Pushing back against the Trump agenda and at the same time pushing forward on our vision of a clean, safe world where the rights of all people are protected and expanded means we all must work together.

Join us on April 29th as we resist, build, and rise in the face of the threats to our communities. Starts at 2pm at the Federal Building in downtown Minneapolis with a march and rally through downtown.

Students for Justice & Peace will be coordinating transportation to the march for those that want to join! (no need to be a member)

 

People’s Climate Solidarity March – DC

MN350, MNIPL, TakeAction Minnesota & other local partners will be coordinating buses for members of our communities to head out to Washington, DC from Minnesota. If you’d like to make the trip to DC, there are tickets available for the buses going out.

READY TO MAKE THE TRIP?

Get your ticket here: http://tinyurl.com/pcm2tickets

Notify the department of Justice & Peace Studies at UST if you are an interested student. If enough people are, they will look into funding.

 

The Energy Fair – St. Paul, MN

When: Monday, May 8th, 12pm – Wed, May 10, 5pm

Where: Harriet Island Regional Park

Celebrate clean energy and sustainable living in St. Paul!

Admission to workshops and exhibits is FREE and open to the public! All Access Passes include featured speakers, entertainment, and solar professional workshops. Discounted Passes on sale April 1 – July 24.

Organized by The Midwest Renewable Energy Association, The Energy Fair started out in Central Wisconsin and is coming to Minnesota for the first time, to build community resilience, energy democracy, and bring folks together to Learn. Connect. and Empower each other to build a sustainable future!

 

Northern Spark

Climate Chaos l Climate Rising

When: Sunset June 10th – Sunrise June 11th

Where: Metro Transit Green Line

Northern Spark is a free all-night art festival exploring the effects of climate change through participatory projects happening in neighborhoods along Metro Transit’s Green Line. From sunset on June 10 to sunrise on June 11, Northern Spark will illuminate and draw audiences to neighborhoods and public spaces all along the METRO Green Line, connecting Minneapolis and Saint Paul.

Experience the largest Northern Spark yet, with nearly 70 art projects organized around neighborhood nodes: Cedar Riverside/West Bank, Weisman Art Museum/East Bank, Little Africa/Snelling Ave, Rondo/Lexington Ave, and Little Mekong/ Western Ave. In downtown Minneapolis the festival moves from its usual river location to The Commons, the new green space at Portland and 5th, and culminates in Saint Paul at Union Depot, the Green Line terminus in Lowertown.

This year, every artist has translated their project into an action you can do on the spot or in the future or every day going forward. Something to cherish, nourish, explore, encourage, modify, argue with, live by, do. Some may think that these actions are trivial. They believe they are not. Taken together, whether over the course of one night or every day for the next four years, they represent the people rising. Only together can we make change

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SUST Courses Fall 2017

Take a class with a Sustainability Designation!

 To find class times go to https://www.stthomas.edu/osi/forstudents/sustcourses/fall2017sustcourses/

 

BIOL 102: Conservation Biology

An introduction to the basic concepts of conservation biology, including the history of conservation, the value of biological diversity, threats to biodiversity, conservation at the population, species, and community levels, and applications to human activities. Laboratories will emphasize data collection and analysis, and the practical application of conservation practices. This course is designed to meet the needs of the Environmental Studies major for a core course in environmental biology. Two laboratory hours per week. This course fulfills the core-area in natural science in the Natural Science and Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

BIOL 209: Biology of Sustainability

Influences of humans on the global environment have reached unprecedented levels, increasing the need for society to strive to live in a sustainable manner. Many issues facing the environment have a biological basis. Thus, an understanding of basic biology is necessary to understand and address many environmental issues. This course will cover the fundamental biology involved with five environmental issues at the global scale: climate change, excessive nutrient loading into ecosystems, agricultural production, chemical contaminants, and loss of biodiversity. Specific biological principles to be covered include energy and nutrient mass balance by organisms and ecosystems, homeostasis and organismal physiology, and population dynamics and conservation biology. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 208, or any 100-level GEOL, and CHEM 112 or CHEM 115

BIOL 435: Aquatic Biology

Characteristics of lakes, streams and other aquatic habitats; including plant and animal communities, water chemistry and productivity. Use of recent primary literature to learn and evaluate field techniques, data collection and data analyses. Both individual and class research projects focus on aquatic systems. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 330 or 333, or in any two 300-level biology courses; STAT 220 or MATH 303 strongly recommended

COJO 100: Public Speaking

Preparation, presentation, and evaluation of original speeches by each student throughout the semester; special emphasis given to selecting and researching topics, organizing evidence, analyzing audiences, sharpening style and tone, communicating ethically and listening critically. This course is designed for students who are not pursuing a Communication and Journalism major. COJO majors may only take this course with permission from the department chair.

 COJO 258: Writing/Designing for the Web

This course teaches students HTML and Web-page production. The goal is to help students develop strategies for writing, editing, designing and publishing a Website that meets professional standards.

COJO 372: Environmental Communication

This course focuses on the communication of mediated information about the environment. Students will examine what makes (and what has made) the environmental stories we tell about ourselves, from writing about agriculture, nature and spirituality to green advertising, the rhetoric of the environmental movement, and environmental movies and music. Prerequisite: COJO 111 or permission of instructor

 ECON 337: Econ of the Public Sector

This course examines the role of government in a modern economy. It develops a set of concepts that will allow students to evaluate policy alternatives. The following are among the particular topics likely to be addressed: externalities and environmental protection, education, the redistribution of income, health care, social insurance, taxation and tax reform, cost-benefit analysis, fiscal federalism, and state and local government finance. In each case, the focus is on whether intervention by government is appropriate, what the most effective form of any such intervention is, and how alternative policy interventions affect the private decisions made by citizens and business firms.

 ENGL 315: Environmental Writing/Community

How do we write about the environment in an age of rapid climate change, and is there anything we can do to get involved in our local community? In Environmental Writing and Community Outreach, students will attempt to grapple with these questions while striving toward hope. Students will discuss and analyze texts that interrogate the Anthropocene–the current geological age which has been dominated by human activity–and use that thinking to collaborate with local organizations focused on sustainability right here in the Twin Cities. Possible texts include FIELD NOTES FROM A CATASTROPHE by Elizabeth Kolbert, THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING by Naomi Klein, and WRITING NATURE by Carolyn Ross. This course satisfies the Theory and Practice distribution requirement for English majors and counts as a non-literature course for English with Writing Emphasis majors. This course also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and counts towards the new Sustainability minor. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

ENVR 151: Environmental Challenges

A study of the interaction of humans and the environment over time and space; a broad introduction that integrates a variety of social-science perspectives into an understanding of the environment and the relations between humans and nature. Specific topics include ecology, population, economic development, resources and sustainable development.

ENVR 298: Topics Conservation Planning

 

ENVR 298: Topics Global Energy Landscapes

 

GEOG 111: Human Geography

This course explores the effects of social, economic, environmental, political, and demographic change from a geographic perspective. It introduces students to a broad range of topics, including the effects of population growth, human impact on the environment, economic development, and globalization. Offered every semester. This course fulfills the Social Analysis and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

GEOG 321: Geographic Information Systems

The theme of this course is how to perform data analysis using Geographic Information Systems. Specific topics include spatial database operations, buffers, map overlay and address matching. The course illustrates the principles of Geographic Information Systems using a variety of real-world applications from demography to environmental studies. This course uses a blended course format and students should be prepared to spend 50% of their time working independently.

GEOL 111: Intro Physical Geology

A study of the Earth’s properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth’s surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

GEOL 115: Environmental Geology

This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114. Course open to Sophomores only, unless by instructor’s permission.

HIST 112: Modern World Since 1550

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

MKTG 300: Principles of Marketing

This course uses a managerial point of view. It focuses on understanding the needs and desires of customers in order to develop effective strategies for business. Students are taught to consider organizational, social, competitive, technological, economic, behavioral, and legal forces in crafting effective marketing programs. Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SPAN 301: Advanced Written Spanish & Culture

Intensive practice in written Spanish using selected materials to acquire a high level of competence in writing Spanish. This writing course aims to improve technique, expand syntactic depth, increase vocabulary and learn good writing through a process approach involving stages of idea development, thesis construction, structural development, bibliographic notation, evaluation of ideas and rewriting of the text. Lectures and class discussions are based on major topics that relate to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Written skills will be assessed. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 300 or its equivalent with a C- or better.

THEO 459: Theology & Environment

This course examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level.

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Environmental Action–Events in Community!

Interested in sustainability? Want to get involved in environmental action? Check out the events below!

 

 

Solar Energy Taking off in MN

When: Tuesday, April 18th, 6:00-8:15pm

Where: 5200 85th Ave N, Brooklyn Park, MN 55443, USA

 

Dan Ruiz, Brooklyn Park’s Operations and Maintenance Manager, will tell us about the city’s big venture into solar energy. He will describe which buildings were chosen for solar panels, how the solar panels will be financed, and how much money the city expects to save on its electricity costs.

 

There will be a free pizza buffet at 6pm.

 

Minnesota Water Action Day at the Capitol!

When: Wednesday, April 19th

Where: Training/Meetings with Legislators 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Rally in the Rotunda at 1:00 PM​

 

This is a day of public action and advocacy to let lawmakers know we care about our water. This all-day event will include a rally, issue trainings and meetings with your legislators. Come for all or part of the day.

There will be trainings in the morning, on how to actively engage legislators and on the water issues that we face in Minnesota. Throughout the day there will be events and other ways to keep people engaged, and the rally will be held in the Capitol Rotunda at 1:00 PM with more than 20+ water groups..

 

No RSVP necessary for the rally. RSVP to participate in issue trainings and meetings with legislators here: mnwateractionday.eventbrite.com

Kids Climate March – MN

When: April 22nd 10am-1pm

This Earth Day, kids will take to the streets and march for climate justice.

 

Young people are the global frontline of climate impacts since they will suffer worse impacts of climate change than older generations.

Young people know climate change is real.

They know it is human caused.

They know their future is at stake.

They are insistent that our leadership take action

And they are not interested in excuses.

 

So join us this Earth Day for a powerful, fun, and family friendly march for climate justice.

 

Where: Begins at the Science Museum of MN, 120 W. Kellogg Blvd. Meets up with the Science March at Cathedral Hill Park at 11am.

 

Official March for Science – MN

When: April 22nd11am – 2pm

When: beginning at Cathedral Hill Park

 

The March for Science champions publicly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good, and for political leaders and policymakers to enact evidence-based policies in the public interest.

 

People’s Climate Solidarity March – MN

When: Saturday, April 29th 2:30-6

 

Join the People’s Climate March solidarity event in the Twin Cities.

The People’s Climate March (2.0) is happening to challenge the backwards and dangerous policies of the Trump Administration and the threat they pose to our climate and our communities.

 

This is a moment to bring the range of progressive social change movements together. Pushing back against the Trump agenda and at the same time pushing forward on our vision of a clean, safe world where the rights of all people are protected and expanded means we all must work together.

 

Join us on April 29th as we resist, build, and rise in the face of the threats to our communities. Starts at 2pm at the Federal Building in downtown Minneapolis with a march and rally through downtown.

 

Students for Justice & Peace will be coordinating transportation to the march for those that want to join! (no need to be a member)

People’s Climate Solidarity March – DC

MN350, MNIPL, TakeAction Minnesota & other local partners will be coordinating buses for members of our communities to head out to Washington, DC from Minnesota. If you’d like to make the trip to DC, there are tickets available for the buses going out.

 

READY TO MAKE THE TRIP?

Get your ticket here: http://tinyurl.com/pcm2tickets

 

Notify the department of Justice & Peace Studies at UST if you are an interested student. If enough people are, they will look into funding.

 

The Energy Fair – St. Paul, MN

When: Monday, May 8th, 12pm – Wed, May 10, 5pm

Where: Harriet Island Regional Park

 

Celebrate clean energy and sustainable living in St. Paul!

Admission to workshops and exhibits is FREE and open to the public! All Access Passes include featured speakers, entertainment, and solar professional workshops. Discounted Passes on sale April 1 – July 24.

Organized by The Midwest Renewable Energy Association, The Energy Fair started out in Central Wisconsin and is coming to Minnesota for the first time, to build community resilience, energy democracy, and bring folks together to Learn. Connect. and Empower each other to build a sustainable future!

 

Northern Spark

Climate Chaos l Climate Rising

When: Sunset June 10th – Sunrise June 11th

Where: Metro Transit Green Line

 

Northern Spark is a free all-night art festival exploring the effects of climate change through participatory projects happening in neighborhoods along Metro Transit’s Green Line. From sunset on June 10 to sunrise on June 11, Northern Spark will illuminate and draw audiences to neighborhoods and public spaces all along the METRO Green Line, connecting Minneapolis and Saint Paul.

Experience the largest Northern Spark yet, with nearly 70 art projects organized around neighborhood nodes: Cedar Riverside/West Bank, Weisman Art Museum/East Bank, Little Africa/Snelling Ave, Rondo/Lexington Ave, and Little Mekong/ Western Ave. In downtown Minneapolis the festival moves from its usual river location to The Commons, the new green space at Portland and 5th, and culminates in Saint Paul at Union Depot, the Green Line terminus in Lowertown.

This year, every artist has translated their project into an action you can do on the spot or in the future or every day going forward. Something to cherish, nourish, explore, encourage, modify, argue with, live by, do. Some may think that these actions are trivial. They believe they are not. Taken together, whether over the course of one night or every day for the next four years, they represent the people rising. Only together can we make change

Uncategorized

Sustainability Courses Fall 2017

Interested in sustainability? Make sure to check out course offerings for Fall 2017 that include a sustainability component where you can gain some real-world experience and contribute to an area of need in the community!

 

Fall 2017:

Take a class with a Sustainability Designation!

 

To find class times go to https://www.stthomas.edu/osi/forstudents/sustcourses/fall2017sustcourses/

 

BIOL 102: Conservation Biology

An introduction to the basic concepts of conservation biology, including the history of conservation, the value of biological diversity, threats to biodiversity, conservation at the population, species, and community levels, and applications to human activities. Laboratories will emphasize data collection and analysis, and the practical application of conservation practices. This course is designed to meet the needs of the Environmental Studies major for a core course in environmental biology. Two laboratory hours per week. This course fulfills the core-area in natural science in the Natural Science and Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

 

BIOL 209: Biology of Sustainability

Influences of humans on the global environment have reached unprecedented levels, increasing the need for society to strive to live in a sustainable manner. Many issues facing the environment have a biological basis. Thus, an understanding of basic biology is necessary to understand and address many environmental issues. This course will cover the fundamental biology involved with five environmental issues at the global scale: climate change, excessive nutrient loading into ecosystems, agricultural production, chemical contaminants, and loss of biodiversity. Specific biological principles to be covered include energy and nutrient mass balance by organisms and ecosystems, homeostasis and organismal physiology, and population dynamics and conservation biology. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 208, or any 100-level GEOL, and CHEM 112 or CHEM 115

 

BIOL 435: Aquatic Biology

Characteristics of lakes, streams and other aquatic habitats; including plant and animal communities, water chemistry and productivity. Use of recent primary literature to learn and evaluate field techniques, data collection and data analyses. Both individual and class research projects focus on aquatic systems. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 330 or 333, or in any two 300-level biology courses; STAT 220 or MATH 303 strongly recommended

 

COJO 100: Public Speaking

Preparation, presentation, and evaluation of original speeches by each student throughout the semester; special emphasis given to selecting and researching topics, organizing evidence, analyzing audiences, sharpening style and tone, communicating ethically and listening critically. This course is designed for students who are not pursuing a Communication and Journalism major. COJO majors may only take this course with permission from the department chair.

 

COJO 258: Writing/Designing for the Web

This course teaches students HTML and Web-page production. The goal is to help students develop strategies for writing, editing, designing and publishing a Website that meets professional standards.

 

COJO 372: Environmental Communication

This course focuses on the communication of mediated information about the environment. Students will examine what makes (and what has made) the environmental stories we tell about ourselves, from writing about agriculture, nature and spirituality to green advertising, the rhetoric of the environmental movement, and environmental movies and music. Prerequisite: COJO 111 or permission of instructor

 

ECON 337: Econ of the Public Sector

This course examines the role of government in a modern economy. It develops a set of concepts that will allow students to evaluate policy alternatives. The following are among the particular topics likely to be addressed: externalities and environmental protection, education, the redistribution of income, health care, social insurance, taxation and tax reform, cost-benefit analysis, fiscal federalism, and state and local government finance. In each case, the focus is on whether intervention by government is appropriate, what the most effective form of any such intervention is, and how alternative policy interventions affect the private decisions made by citizens and business firms.

 

ENGL 315: Environmental Writing/Community

How do we write about the environment in an age of rapid climate change, and is there anything we can do to get involved in our local community? In Environmental Writing and Community Outreach, students will attempt to grapple with these questions while striving toward hope. Students will discuss and analyze texts that interrogate the Anthropocene–the current geological age which has been dominated by human activity–and use that thinking to collaborate with local organizations focused on sustainability right here in the Twin Cities. Possible texts include FIELD NOTES FROM A CATASTROPHE by Elizabeth Kolbert, THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING by Naomi Klein, and WRITING NATURE by Carolyn Ross. This course satisfies the Theory and Practice distribution requirement for English majors and counts as a non-literature course for English with Writing Emphasis majors. This course also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and counts towards the new Sustainability minor. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

 

ENVR 151: Environmental Challenges

A study of the interaction of humans and the environment over time and space; a broad introduction that integrates a variety of social-science perspectives into an understanding of the environment and the relations between humans and nature. Specific topics include ecology, population, economic development, resources and sustainable development.

ENVR 298: Topics Conservation Planning

 

ENVR 298: Topics Global Energy Landscapes

 

GEOG 111: Human Geography

This course explores the effects of social, economic, environmental, political, and demographic change from a geographic perspective. It introduces students to a broad range of topics, including the effects of population growth, human impact on the environment, economic development, and globalization. Offered every semester. This course fulfills the Social Analysis and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

 

GEOG 321: Geographic Information Systems

The theme of this course is how to perform data analysis using Geographic Information Systems. Specific topics include spatial database operations, buffers, map overlay and address matching. The course illustrates the principles of Geographic Information Systems using a variety of real-world applications from demography to environmental studies. This course uses a blended course format and students should be prepared to spend 50% of their time working independently.

 

GEOL 111: Intro Physical Geology

A study of the Earth’s properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth’s surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

 

GEOL 115: Environmental Geology

This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114. Course open to Sophomores only, unless by instructor’s permission.

HIST 112: Modern World Since 1550

 

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

 

MKTG 300: Principles of Marketing

 

This course uses a managerial point of view. It focuses on understanding the needs and desires of customers in order to develop effective strategies for business. Students are taught to consider organizational, social, competitive, technological, economic, behavioral, and legal forces in crafting effective marketing programs. Prerequisites: Junior standing

 

SPAN 301: Advanced Written Spanish & Culture

 

Intensive practice in written Spanish using selected materials to acquire a high level of competence in writing Spanish. This writing course aims to improve technique, expand syntactic depth, increase vocabulary and learn good writing through a process approach involving stages of idea development, thesis construction, structural development, bibliographic notation, evaluation of ideas and rewriting of the text. Lectures and class discussions are based on major topics that relate to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Written skills will be assessed. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 300 or its equivalent with a C- or better.

 

THEO 459: Theology & Environment

 

This course examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level

EA Blog

Q & A with Patrick Winter, President of the Active Minds Club

Last semester, Patrick Winter was interviewed on his involvement in Active Minds. Read the Q & A to find out more about his work with Active Minds and his thoughts on the important topic of mental health.

 

Q: What is the mission of the Active Minds club?

A: To increase awareness and decrease stigma surrounding mental health issues on campus, as well as to create a safe space for students to talk about their stories of mental health battles.

 

Q: Why did you choose to be involved in Active Minds?

A: I became extremely passionate about mental health advocacy after learning that my brother had developed a suicide plan. He was going through the most difficult year of his life as a junior/rising senior in high school and I was one of the first people he told. I still remember where I was the day he told me. It was devastating because I consider him to be one of my best friends. It had an extreme impact on my family. Fortunately, with the right combination of support and follow up, he was able to overcome the darkest time in his life. Though difficult, it made me want to do more for others who are struggling, and Active Minds at St. Thomas gave me a way to do just that.

 

Q: What are your most valuable experiences being in the club?

A: It brings me a lot of happiness and comfort knowing that all of our executive board members and our club members are like-minded in the sense that they too, are committed to strengthening the conversation surrounding mental health. We have members constantly approaching us about ideas for programs. I’ve been encouraged by the stories that both members and presenters have shared.

 

Q: What do you hope to achieve by your involvement in Active Minds?

A:  I really want to help people understand the best ways to help a friend, family member, roommate, etc. who is struggling. I often hear people saying “I don’t know what to say or do.” I created an informal research project on this issue and have presented it to club members, RAs on campus, and USG Executive Board. For me, however, it’s not about accomplishment and achievement. I’m more motivated and focused on opening up the conversation, because I have less than a year left as a student at St. Thomas. If I can reach just a few people, then I feel confident that mental health advocacy will move forward in good hands (and minds).

 

Q: Tell us about your CA conference experience:

A: It was amazing!! I learned a lot about mental health on college campuses and it was really inspiring to hear people’s stories about mental health battles. It was great to be around so many like-minded people. I also was given the opportunity to present my informal research project and PowerPoint at the conference at the Creative Programming Expo. It seemed to really captivate everyone that came to me. I really wanted to share PowerPoint/research with as many people as I could, and over 35 Active Minds chapters from across the country signed up to receive the PowerPoint! It was a humbling experience.

 

Q: What have you learned in being involved in Active Minds?

A: People want to as much as they can. Mental illness is an issue that has reached nearly everyone’s lives, whether it’s a personal struggle or someone they know and love have struggled. I’ve also realized how vulnerable and brave people have to be to share a story, and to me it shows extreme courage and strength. The best way to get a conversation going is by sharing a story.

 

Q: What frustrates you the most about mental illness stigma?

A: A huge misconception that people have is that mental illness can be healed quickly. For example, it’s not uncommon that someone who is clinically depressed to be told “Just be happy” or “You’ll get over it.” In another example, those who suffer from eating disorders or eating disorder-like symptoms are often told “Why can’t you just eat?” or “You’ll feel better once you eat something.” It’s also disheartening to hear that people are hesitant to seek counseling because it’s “for crazy people.” Two things that bother me about this: “crazy” is the most overused stigmatized word, and counseling is for anyone.

 

Q: How do you see your involvement in this club now impacting your future?

A: It has directed me to consider graduate school in Counseling Psychology, School Guidance Counseling, and other related programs. It also makes me a better community advocate for others. I feel like I’m in a better place to have conversations about mental health.

 

Q: How is Active Mind’s mission relevant in the culture of today?

A: I think it’s bringing the mental health conversation back to college campuses. Its mission statement is simply to raise awareness and decrease stigma around mental health. Most people are aware about mental health stigma—that’s where they start.

 

Q: What is advice you would give students struggling with the mental illness stigma, whether themselves or with someone close to them?

A: You’re not alone. There so many people around you that are going through difficult times as well. People are willing to help you as well! Whether it’s a professional counselor, your family members, friends, or roommates, people care. Find healthy coping skills that work for you. Music, art, exercise, talking to people, etc. are some of the most helpful ways to cope. In terms of stigma, educate people about this exact problem. Let them know that healing is a long and difficult process.

If you’re wanting to help someone, always remember that you are their source of hope and strength, but not their counselor or therapist. Don’t try to fix their problem or give a diagnosis. If you are trying to see how they’re doing, ask. If you suspect something is wrong, ask about behaviors you’ve noticed “I’ve noticed lately you___. How is everything going?” “Is there anything I can do to help you?” And always be consistent with following up and checking in.

 

Q: Anything else you think we should know?

A: Do your part in combating mental illness—bring it up in conversation, fight the stigma, and look out for each other. It can take just one person to make all the difference. If anyone is going through a difficult time and needs a friend to help, I would be more than happy to talk! My email is wint9603@stthomas.edu and my phone number is 563.379.8775.

EA Blog

Q & A with Ashley Mandt & Dani Hanson on Biases, Body Image, and Compassion

A brief interview was done with Ashley Mandt and Dani Hanson who are student researchers investigating how both self-compassion and other-compassion play into body judgment and biases. Check out the Q & A below to learn more about their research topic, why they chose it, and what it is like to do student research.

Research project title/topics: Implicit and Explicit Biases and Body Judgment: The Role of Self- and Other- Compassion

Q: Why did you choose these topics to research?

A: We were interested in how self- and other- compassion might play a role in implicit and explicit biases regarding body judgment. You hear a lot about self-compassion and the benefits of it—but you don’t hear as much about how other-compassion might play a role or relate to these biases, especially regarding figure judgment.

Q: How does our primarily female-based population of research participants affect your study?

A: We will not be able to determine a significant difference between genders in regards to this study, being that this is the case.

Q: How does your study reflect on pop society and culture today?

A: We are exposed to various stimuli via the mass media—this exposure, playing a vital role in establishing biases and judgments of others. While our study has no way of measuring media’s influence, per-say, it will be interesting to uncover these results and consider the potential role of our technological-based society.

Q: How do you foresee this research proceeding into the future? Implications? Conferences?

A: We hope to attend the Midwestern Psychological Association Conference in April of 2017 to present our findings. We hope to uncover some interesting and significant results, potentially leading us to establish further curiosities.

Q: What was the professor/student researcher dynamic like?

A: It’s very fun—and great experience! There is a lot of mentorship available, which is helpful in regards to gaining experiencing and growing in the psych field. Dr. RR has really allowed us to take the reins on this one—challenging us, while guiding us through.

Q: How does your group function well?

A: There is quite a bit of work that goes into research—especially being that you’re a student juggling other things like classes, sports, and work. What’s been most helpful for us has been communicating through email and getting together when we can for coffee and conversation regarding our research.

Q: What is your advice to students with an interest in performing research?

A: It’s such a wonderful experience—take advantage of it! It may appear difficult to get involved, but really, all you have to do is ask. You will gain so much!

EA Blog

Mice, Meth, and Midbrains

Dr. Jessica Siegel, Micaela Rud, and Thao Do worked together on a research project titled “Effects of early adolescent methamphetamine exposure on anxiety-like behavior and corticosterone levels in mice.” Dr. Siegel initiated this project as an extension of her lab work on the effects of meth on behavior and brain function in adolescents, inviting Neuroscience students Rud and Do to assist her.

Within the Psychology and Neuroscience departments, students learn that different professors have different research styles in working with their students. When asked, Rud had very positive reviews of the professor/student dynamic with Dr. Siegel. She said Dr. Siegel encouraged independent completion of tasks and then provided feedback and explanations after the students worked on their own. “For me, it was extremely helpful to see what I was initially capable of and to then further improve my skills,” Rud said.

The purpose of the study was to examine the immediate effects of methamphetamine exposure on locomotor activity, anxiety-like behavior, and cortiocosterone levels (i.e. stress hormone for mice, like human cortisol) in adolescent male mice. The procedure involved injecting the mice with saline in order to observe their baseline behavior. Following the baseline trial, they received another injection of either saline or methamphetamine depending on their assigned condition. For the motor activity, they recorded the total distance the mice moved, and total time and distance moved in the center of the open field arena was used as a measure of their anxiety-like behavior. At the end of the study, they collected plasma (blood) to quantify the levels of plasma corticosterone.

Their findings showed the meth-exposed mice exhibited higher locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavior compared to the control (saline) condition. Although in previous studies there was an increase in corticosterone levels during meth exposure, they found no difference in corticosterone levels between the two groups of mice.

Dr. Siegel said that her now-published research is important in that it examines the effects of meth on adolescent mice as well as being “the first article to examine anxiety-like behavior in adolescent mice following acute meth exposure.” More research has been done on drug effects on infants and adults, but there is a gap in the literature regarding adolescent development. Using the adolescent mice makes the findings relatable to human adolescents.

Their research findings also suggest that the neuronal mechanisms activated by meth may be different in adolescents than adults. This adds to the literature seeking to understand the adolescent brain’s differences and issues in its developmental process. As drug use is prevalent among teens, these findings and future research may help to better understand the adolescent brain under drug exposure and provide new research for better treatment options.

Their research study was most impressively published in Neuroscience Letters, Rud saying that, “The publication process went much faster than expected and we are very proud of how everything turned out.”

Be that as it may, her co-researcher Do described the laborious process of writing, rereading, and revisions for the paper. “The process to publication was long and full of many revisions. However, going through the paper and re-reading it multiple times helps you understand your own study a lot more, because as you’re reading, you’re picking up different things as you go,” Do said.

She further discussed the excitement of participating in a publication experience, that “being able to publicly share with others is a wonderful opportunity because of the contribution of knowledge you provide to the field, other scientists, and students as they learn about this topic,” Do said.

Along with the publication, the study was presented at the Midbrains conference held at St. Thomas this fall and submitted to the MPA conference for this spring. Dr. Siegel plans to replicate this project and expand it to adult mice as well. Unanswered questions regarding corticosterone level’s possible relationship to anxiety-like behavior and even sex differences in meth exposure remain to be studied.

All three encouraged students to seek out opportunities to work on neuroscience research, to experience the difficulties and the rewards, and to take advantage of the opportunities to learn as much as possible. In doing this, students can gain invaluable experience in order to become better researchers and scientists in the neuroscience department here at St. Thomas; skills which will undoubtedly continue to serve them well when they enter the professional research world after graduation.

 

EA Blog

American Board of Sport Psychology 2017, 12th Annual Internship/Research Assistantship/Visiting Fellowship Program in Applied Sport Psychology in New York City

We are pleased to announce the American Board of Sport Psychology’s 2017 12th annual Internship/Research Assistantship/Visiting Fellowship Program in Applied Sport Psychology. Over 120 participants, including undergraduates, graduate students and faculty from universities and colleges worldwide as well as practicing psychologists and sport psychology professionals and coaches have been trained in our evidence-based athlete assessment and intervention protocol. Cohorts of undergraduates have presented on research the APA annual conventions and other professional conferences. Our program’s has established a tradition of generating and preparing publications and making presentations on our various lines of research at important meetings. Program alumni have also continued their education in psychology, sport psychology and related fields as graduate students at top colleges throughout the United States and abroard. Our practitioner graduates include an Olympic sport psychology consultant and numerous sport psychologists who work with professional sport teams as well as practicing clinicians (psychologists and psychiatrists). Many of our students have attended on study grants and received academic credit for completing our program. Two of our undergraduate students completed senior honors thesis projects that were based on our protocol, one at the University of Pennsylvania, the other at Wellesley college.


Note: Our summer program counts toward ABSP certification program practicum and final project requirements.

PROGRAM VEVUE: New York City with possible satellite session in New Hampshire (baseball psychology; special distance-based programs can also be arranged)

DATES: May to October (May and September sessions may be abbreviated based on enrollment)

Requests for information documents/applications are now being accepted.

If interested please contact: rcarlstedt@americanboardofsportpsychology.org

EA Blog

Sustainability: UST and Beyond

The Office for Sustainable Initiatives gained headway last year and this semester with the introduction of the Sustainable Communities Project program. The program allows students to engage in “experiential, community-engaged learning in sustainability” by working with businesses and local governments. Below is an interview with psychology professor and director of the program, Dr. Amel.


How and when did you get interested in the topic of sustainability?  

Dr. Amel: I realized that I had a voice to protect critical habitat when I was in graduate school in the early 1990s. Connecting work and environmental concern really ramped up in the early 2000s, so I guess it took me about a decade to really figure out how to combine my interests. At that point I started working sustainability into my courses and developing new courses with sustainability content. In 2007 I followed in Britain Scott’s footsteps and spent 8 years as the Director of Environmental Studies, advising students and building a new curriculum that can serve more students more flexibly.  It’s been very satisfying.

Describe how you got started with the office of sustainability to initiate community partnerships in the classroom. 

Dr. Amel: The Sustainable Communities Partnership is based on a model from the University of Oregon that we discovered about 5 years ago.  I fell in love with it because it is such a win-win-win situation for students, faculty and community and it deals with sustainability at the systems level.  As a psychologist it has become clear to me that individual-level change while necessary is too slow for the changes we need for future survival, so I’m really interested in work that changes whole systems, which in turn influence large numbers of people at once.  After one semester we had the partnerships up and running and already have almost 500 students from 16 different disciplines working on 24 municipal sustainability projects.

The Office of Sustainability is really a clearing house for a lot of initiatives that we have been developing through grass-roots efforts over the last 15 years. So over time we [other faculty] found funding to run faculty development seminars, small implementation grants, and an award for awesome ideas. Now all of these classes are tagged with a SUST designation so interested students can find them, and ultimately we hope that a new Sustainability minor will depend on these SUST-designated courses.

Where do you see the office of sustainability going in the future? Do you think more courses will become involved in partnerships?  

Dr. Amel: Our goal is to have all of the colleges and schools at St. Thomas actively involved in these projects.  The College of Arts and Sciences has a very agile faculty and they’ve really stepped up in a big way!  We hope it catches fire elsewhere too. We also hope more students pick up sustainability-related projects for their young scholars, community-engaged, and collaborative inquiry grants!  Deadlines are coming in February; check out the SCP webpage for available projects!

How do businesses get involved in the project?

Dr. Amel:  While our main focus is on municipalities, watersheds and other governmental bodies, we are open to any collaboration that addresses systems in a meaningful way.

Example: We were actually contacted by a really cool, carbon-negative coffee company, Tiny Footprint, in Brooklyn Park who were interested in collaborating with us on a lot of levels. They are carbon-negative because they are managing their operations in a sustainable way AND a significant part of their profits go toward replanting cloud forests on the coffee plantations that supply their beans.  We’re working with them on projects that can be shared with other businesses.

How do you see the Sustainable Communities Partnership having an effect on your students?

Dr. Amel: Students often go from the frying pan into the fire when they graduate. I think the biggest benefit to students of engaging in SCP projects is getting experience working with the messy real world while they’ve got a safety net (faculty and the OSI). This creates a smoother transition between book learning and being professionals in their fields.

This is the second year of having the Sustainable Communities Partnership, do you have any plans for next semester? Next year?

Dr. Amel: We aim for 8 projects each semester, but we usually end up with 12 or so because of faculty enthusiasm.  This is an incredibly high workload for the one full-time employee, Maria Dahmus, who is our rockin’ OSI Assistant Director.  But she is amazing and is 100% committed to providing awesome opportunities for students.  We have a few interns each year who help out with events, communication, and database management, so that’s something for people to consider 😉  Next year we will be branching out to some new partners as we wind down with Elk River, our current primary partner.  All cities need to figure out how to become sustainable, so we’ve got our work cut out for us for a very long time!

Uncategorized

Internship Program Opportunities: MN Department of Human Services

Internships being offered:

  • 6 unpaid internships

Unpaid internships available are as follows (see TommieCareers ):

  • Digital Forensic Analyst Intern, Internal Audits
    • Desired skills: Legal expertise, Computer skills, Analytical thinking, Interpersonal skills, Investigation techniques
    • scott.a.stillman@state.mn.us
  • Foster Care Policy Intern, Division of Child Safety and Permanency
    • Desired skills: Research, Writing, Oral communication, Basic windows knowledge, Ability to work in diverse groups, Teamwork/interpersonal skills, Quantitative and report writing skills, Data collection and/or analysis
    • lorna.batton@state.mn.us
  • Media Outreach Intern, Commission of Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Minnesotans
    • Desired skills: Writing, Oral communication, Ability to work in diverse groups, Teamwork/interpersonal skills, Analytical skills, Evaluation , Basic understanding of web content management
    • david.emery@state.mn.us
  • Population Health Management of Jensen Class Members Intern, Jensen/Olmstead Quality Assurance and Compliance Office
    • Desired skills: Data collection, Analysis, Experience of population health management, Knowledge of precision business intelligence software
    • peg.booth@state.mn.us
  • Project Analyst Intern, Commission of Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Minnesotans
    • david.emery@state.mn.us
  • Research Intern, Mental Health Services
    • Desired skills: Writing, Oral communication, Excel skills, Analysis, Ability to work in diverse groups, Teamwork/interpersonal skills, Quantitative and report writing skills, Evaluation , Data collection
    • terry.gromala@state.mn.us
  • Human Resource Intern, Mental Health Services
    • Desired skills: Analytical skills, Oral and written communication skills, Organizational skills
    • melissa.a.hines@comcast.net
    • Application due Friday January 20th

2017-internship-positions

EA Blog

What are alumni doing now? A peek into the lives of alumni after graduation

This past summer, Dr. Giebenhain was able to attend the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) conference. SPSSI is an international conference that conveniently was held in Minneapolis from June 24-26 this past summer. While attending this international conference was exciting for Dr. Giebenhain, seeing alumni at the conference was also one of the best parts of the conference.

One alumni at the conference that Dr. Giebenhain saw was Professor Sarah Cronin, who is teaching the Psychology of Adolescence at St. Thomas this semester and was a former Educational Assistant (EA). A Counseling & Student Personnel Psychology Ph.D. candidate at the University of Minnesota, Professor Cronin was presenting her research titled, The effect of geographic, school and individual resources on achievement.

Funded by the National Science Foundation, this research examined the connection between school counseling and student achievement. Currently, Minnesota ranks at nearly the lowest level for school counseling, and the ratio of students to counselors is equally dismal. She is hoping that her research can inform state legislation. The research may also help ascertain which students can benefit from school counselors. More information on her research and results can be found at http://cascw.umn.edu/portfolio-items/the-school-counselor-to-student-ratio-does-having-a-school-counselor-matter-ml-28/.professor-sarah-cronin

                                                 Sarah Cronin

Another familiar face is Johanna Younce (also known as JoJo). This former EA has launched herself into her first year of the clinical psychology program at Northern Illinois University in Dekalb, IL. She was already busy presenting research at SPSSI only a month after graduation. The research, a collaboration of Dr. Giebenhain, Johanna, and other students, was called Looking in the mirror: Psychology Today 1967-1976. The poster was the culmination of a research project for Dr. Giebenhain’s History of Psychology course. Drawn from an intensive examination of the first 10 years’ of Psychology Today, the research explored the social justice themes present in the magazine articles. Reflecting on the findings of the research, Johanna notes that, “so many of the issues being talked about during this time are similar to or the same as the issues we face today.” However, on a lighter note, Johanna also pointed to the need to “have hope and keep fighting- as researchers.”

johanna-younce                                                                                        Johanna Younce

When describing the conference atmosphere, Johanna found the conference to be smaller than MPA and dominated by graduate-level presenters, but she discovered an interested audience at the conference. One person even wanted to see a copy of the poster the day following her presentation.  She also observed that “it made my heart feel lighter knowing that there were so many people concerned about social issues and working to make a difference with their research.”

She also enjoyed seeing Professor Cronin, since she “love[s] meeting other Tommies who are passionate about similar things.” Professor Cronin similarly found it great to see Dr. Giebenhain and Johanna at the conference, because she is very passionate about graduate students and their development. She really liked the chance to experience the “Tommie Network.” While she may expect to see Tommies at MPA, she did not expect to see them at this international conference. However, she loved this connection to her undergraduate alma mater. She also knows Tommies at the University of Minnesota, so she felt that the conference was a “marrying” of her two departments and found this connection very “meaningful.”

When I asked her about her current research work, Johanna shared that she was deciding on the topic for her master’s thesis. At the moment, she is contemplating the topic of scrupulosity, a symptom of OCD which has little research. In addition, she explained, “I’m not conducting any research currently, but I am helping run participants once in a while for one of [my] labmates’ studies…Most of the research in my lab is experimental work focused on obsessive-compulsive symptomatology.”

For students who are researching graduate school, Johanna offered insight into her own experience as a graduate student. “Maybe I shouldn’t be saying this because I don’t want to instill a false sense of hope for you undergrads looking to apply to PhD programs, but this semester has been surprisingly low-stress for me. I know that things will pick up from here, but for now, my life is pretty balanced. I really miss Minnesota’s amazing coffee shops, though. It’s exciting to be around a bunch of intelligent people who are passionate about so many of the same things as you…I’ve never had more nerdy conversations in my life! It’s really a dream come true.”

Yet, as students contemplate their future plans, both former Tommies offer some timely pieces of advice. Professor Cronin highlighted that persistence was important in terms of academics and as a person. She emphasized that a student needed “persistence in every way, in being the person you want to be.”

Johanna also offered two important pieces of wisdom. First, she said, “My greatest advice to all of you at St. Thomas is to take advantage of the opportunities that are offered to you. I would not be here right now if it weren’t for the amazing relationships I’ve built with psychology professors at UST. You have a really unique opportunity to work directly with professors at St. Thomas that students at larger universities don’t have. Take advantage of your lab courses that give you the chance to get involved in every aspect of a research project, get on a research team with a professor you connect with, submit research projects to conferences.”

Johanna also reminded students of another key factor. She advised, “Don’t forget your passion. This is especially important for those of you currently applying to graduate school. There’s a lot of work ahead of you, and if you start to forget why you love it, then it’s all downhill from there. Don’t let yourself get too bogged down in assignments and due dates. Instead, let your passion for science and humanity drive you! You got this!”

EA Blog

College Sleep Questionnaire

The department’s own Roxanne Prichard has just released the website and UST access to her College Sleep Questionnaire.

Students at St. Thomas can take this for their own benefit and self-awareness, the questionnaire providing a pdf document summarizing their sleep schedules and physiological, psychological, and behavioral impediments that could be present and impeding their sleep. Tips to improve sleep are provided as well (of course!).

 

St. Thomas Students can access the questionnaire here.

 

Congrats to Dr. Prichard!

EA Blog

An Interview with Two Young Scholars from 2016

Psychology Department  

William Goodwin & Megan Schouweiler

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Robinson-Riegler

Will Goodwin is a junior at St. Thomas with a major in Economics and minors in Psychology and Catholic Studies. He lives his vocation as a student intensely, pursuing excellence and service in all areas of his life. This year he is running research for Dr. Robinson-Riegler, serving as a Vision Leader through the Center for Ministry, working with the Economics department in their research, and is involved in the Catholic (TommieCatholic and SPO) and Christian communities on campus.

Megan Schouweiler is a junior at St. Thomas with a major in Psychology and minor in Family Studies. She is very driven and displays this especially through her involvement in student activities as the Secretary of Psychology Club, a member of the Aquinas Scholars Honors Program, and also a Freshman Mentor. She is also working under Dr. Robinson-Riegler and Dr. Bock on two research projects this year and is also a Student Intern at the College of Education, Leadership, and Counseling at the UST Graduate School.

 

Megan Schouweiler’s and Will Goodwin’s habitat for the summer was the psychology department in the basement of JRC. Both students focused their research on the practical implications of forgiveness and gratitude, Schouweiler’s project titled “Does Forgiveness Facilitate Forgetfulness?” and Goodwin’s “Do Grateful People Make Better Economic Decisions? The Relationship Between Gratitude and Economic Choice.” Schouweiler’s research project examined forgiveness and memory. Goodwin’s project looked at economic impatience, gratitude, and happiness. Regardless of their different variables, both studies are testament to the depth and character of the two students.

Schouweiler said the reason she chose this research topic was due to her interest in marriage satisfaction and family functioning and the influence of forgiveness in the well-being of these relationships. When asked how the research experience has changed her, Schouweiler said, “This project has given me a lot more confidence in myself and my abilities as a researcher.”

Goodwin also agreed that he appreciated the total exposure and independence of researching. Although he enjoyed the experience, the biggest challenge was having to push himself to do the work, laboring through numerous homogenous empirical articles. “If I didn’t want to put in time and effort into the project, it wasn’t going anywhere,” he said. Schouweiler echoed this sentiment, admitting that being your own supervisor is difficult, especially in making self-imposed deadlines and delving through data.

When asked whether they would encourage students to apply for the Young Scholars Grant for next summer, they both adamantly encouraged their classmates to apply. “Put in the long hours to complete the application and all the prep work because it’s worth it…It’s such a gift to be able to work on something that helps me strive to be more disciplined, and work on something I love,” Goodwin said.

Since both students worked under faculty advisor and Chair of the Department, Dr. Robinson-Riegler, we asked them what it was like working with him. Goodwin said working with “Dr. RR” was valuable and that it is clear how much “Dr. RR” cares about his students in research but also through relationally investing in them.

Schouweiler shared that she and “Dr. RR” are similar in their deadline-oriented work ethic and addiction to morning coffee. “He has very particular food preferences…There were many times when I was sent back to the buffet line to exchange or replace certain food items,” she said.

Both researchers discussed how this project has academically impacted them by giving them the research bug for this fall semester. Beyond academics, Schouweiler said that on a personal level her project will help her in understanding and interacting with people who either need to forgive or ask for forgiveness. In relation to his project on gratitude, Goodwin described the project’s personal impact on him as well. “It has helped me be more conscientious about looking at life with more gratitude, to strive to not take for granted all the beautiful gifts that life has and is giving me,” he said.

The Psychology Department is proud to have two such students representing them to the greater community as exemplars of integrity, hard work, and desire to pursue excellence through psychology and research to acquire a deeper understanding of the human person.

 

 

 

 

 

EA Blog

Classes EAs Have Taken

Emily

Classes taken:

Psych of Work (Amel), Psych of Sustainability (Amel), Cross-Cultural Psych (Bremner), Infancy & Child Development (Jessee), Sensation & Perception (Prichard), Personality Theories (Scott), Research Methods (Wolfe)

Megan

Classes taken:

(Hankerson), (Robinson-Riegler), (Bremner), (Amel), (Bock), (Buri), (Scott), (Tauer), (Jessee)

Molly

Classes taken:

Research Methods (Hankerson), Cognitive Neuroscience (Hankerson), Principles of Neuroscience (Siegel), Neurobiology (Westberry)

Courtney

Classes taken:

Lifespan Development (Bock), Psychological Testing (Bock), Research Methods (Buri), Psychology of Family & Marriage (Buri), Drugs & Behavior (Prichard), Psychology of Sustainability (Scott), General Psychology (Wolfe)

Kristina

Classes taken:

Brain and Human Behavior (Prichard), Research Methods (Wolfe), Psychology of Infancy and Childhood (Jessee), Psychopathology (Giebenhain), Cognition (Robinson-Riegler), Social Psychology (Tauer), Psychology of Adolescence (Cronin)

Ashley

Classes taken:

Research Methods (Buri), Lifespan Development (Jessee), Cognition (Hankerson), Social (Tauer), Psychopathology (Giebenhain), Drugs and Behavior (Siegel)

Iesha

Classes taken:

(Hankerson), (Wolfe), (Wlaschin)

Contact Us: psychologyea@stthomas.edu

  EA Hours (JRC LL 54)

      Monday 9am-9pm,    Tuesday 9am-4pm, 5pm-9pm,    Wednesday 9am-9pm,    Thursday 4pm-9pm,   Sunday 6pm-9pm