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Real Estate Executive Insight Speaker Series Bob Lux – Inside the Mind of A Developer

 

Real Estate Executive Insight Series

Bob Lux – Inside the Mind of A Developer 

Event Details Tuesday, March 28th 2017 5:30 p.m. University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis Campus Schulze Hall, Room 127

A candid conversation with industry leader Bob Lux, Founder Alatus LLC

Quality real estate development requires innovative thinking. Bob Lux, founder of Alatus LLC, has been in the real estate development and investment business for over 30 years. His company’s mission is to provide innovative solutions and high quality projects by wisely using his team’s talents and strengths to achieve the client’s vision and form a better community.   Lux will discuss the challenges, opportunities and trends in developing residential and commercial real estate in the Twin Cities. Lux will also share his views on the condo market and as the largest private owner of parking facilities in Minnesota Bob will outline his expectations for future parking and infrastructure needs in the downtown area.

Agenda 5:30-6 p.m. Networking 6-7 p.m. Presentation by Bob Lux

Register Today
 
Development, Economics, Home Prices, Housing, Housing Trends, Minneapolis / St. Paul Housing, Real Estate Trends, Residential Real Estate, Twin Cities Real Estate

Survey of Twin Cities’ home builders finds them in a slightly more optimistic mood than six months ago

The composite score of this new forecasting tool increased slightly, but there were more significant changes found in the six individual questions that St. Thomas asked industry leaders.

Leaders in the Twin Cities single-family-home-construction industry were “slightly less pessimistic” about market conditions in June than they were last December. That’s according to a survey conducted by the University of St. Thomas Shenehon Center for Real Estate in partnership with the Builders Association of the Twin Cities (BATC). Last December’s survey produced a composite index of 45. The second survey, conducted in June 2016, produced a slightly more optimistic 46. The Twin Cities Home Builders Survey is patterned after St. Thomas’ Minnesota Commercial Real Estate Survey that began in 2010. The home builders survey polls the same panel of 35 industry leaders every six months about their expectations in six key areas of the housing market one year in the future.  The first survey was conducted in December 2015.

“The participants were strongly optimistic in their expectation of increasing sale prices per square foot and the number of single-family housing starts, and they were moderately optimistic about an increase in availability of finished lots in the coming year,” said Herb Tousley, director of Real Estate Programs at the University of St. Thomas. “However, the expectation of increasing land prices and a belief that the cost of building materials will increase over the next year was a cause for concern that tempered the composite index,” according to David Siegel, executive director of the Builders Association of the Twin Cities.  “Increasing prices of land and building materials increase total building costs which in turn creates a drag on single-family housing construction and is reflected in the survey as a pessimistic score. There is also an expectation that mortgage rates are going to increase moderately over the next year. This is also reflected pessimistically in the survey as it adds to the total cost of purchasing a home,” said Siegel.

Tousley noted that these first two surveys are providing a baseline to compare with future surveys. “As we accumulate more survey results over the next few years, the results will begin to reveal market trends that will be useful as a forecasting tool,” he said. “The industry leaders we poll are actively engaged in studying both the demand and supply side of the housing market,” said Tousley. “Since they are involved in creating new housing units and adjusting supply-to-demand conditions, these individuals are close to the actual changes taking place in the market.” These experts are asked to assign a number of zero to 100 for each of the six questions. A midpoint score of 50 is neutral; scores higher than 50 indicate a more favorable outlook and scores lower than 50 indicate a more pessimistic outlook. The survey also provides a composite score, or overall average, for the six questions.

Here are the scores for each of the six questions:

Housing Starts: 63 (up 3 from December)

This score indicates an increasingly optimistic expectation by the panel that the number of new single-family housing starts will increase in the coming year.

Square-foot sale price: 69 (same as December)

This reflects the panel’s strong belief that sale prices will be significantly higher a year from now. The net result is the expectation that when compared to previous years, 2016 will be a much better year for single-family home builders.

Land prices: 31 (up 1 from December)

This pessimistic score changed little from the first survey in December. The score reflects a belief that the rate of increase for land prices is going to be greater than the rate of increase for home prices in general.

Availability of finished lots: 56 (up 6 from December)

This indicates an increasing optimism that there will be more finished lots available over the next 12 months. That’s a good thing for the market since it helps moderate land prices and encourages more construction.

Cost of building materials: 36 (up 2 from December)

Like land prices, this score is just slightly less pessimistic and continues to reflect a concern that some of the gains from increased sale prices and more building starts could be offset by the higher costs of building materials.

 Mortgage rates: 32 (up 2 from December)

This reflects the panel’s expectation that mortgage rates are going to increase moderately over the next year. Most panelists are expecting an increase of .5% to 1%.

June 2016 Homebuilders Image

More Information

Additional details can be found on the Shenehon Center’s website: http://www.stthomas.edu/centers/shenehon/wp-content/uploads/sites/7/2014/07/Twin-Cities-Home-Builders-Survey-June-2016.pdf.

 

Commercial Real Estate, Commercial Real Estate Index, Development, Economics, Industrial Real Estate, Industry News, Investment Real Estate, Office Real Estate, Real Estate Trends, Retail Real Estate, Twin Cities Real Estate

Semiannual Survey of the Twin Cities Commercial Real Estate Experts Predicts Continued Favorable Market Conditions

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Leaders in the field of Minnesota commercial real estate expect to see a continuation of the favorable market conditions for commercial real estate that we have been experiencing for the past two to three years.

May 2016 Results

The semi-annual Minnesota Commercial Real Estate Survey conducted in May 2016 has produced some interesting results. Overall, the survey continues to indicate a slightly less than neutral expectation looking ahead two years to spring 2018 for commercial real estate. The composite index was recorded at 46. This is the sixth consecutive survey where the composite index has been in the 46 – 48 range. Index values greater than 50 represent a more optimistic view of the market over the next two years, with values of less than 50 indicating a more pessimistic view. Although the composite index level is similar to previous surveys the pattern of the individual indexes in the current survey is very different.

As was done with all ten of the previous surveys, the same group of 50 commercial real estate industry leaders involved in development, finance, and investment were polled regarding their expectations of near-term, future commercial real estate activity. One thing we have observed in the current survey is there is less variation in the responses and that has caused a more uniform response rate reflecting the panel’s increased certainty in their views. The individual indexes are detailed below:

Rent Expectations

Less optimistic outlook that rents will continue to increase at current rates. Market conditions expected in spring 2018 are best described by the price for space (rental rates) and the supply of space (occupancy levels). The index for rental rates has declined from a highly optimistic 66 to a somewhat less optimistic 60. This is an indication of an expectation of a moderation of rent growth over the next two years. Higher rents help to offset the increased costs of new construction. A slowdown in rent growth puts pressure on expected returns that will be achieved by developers and owners.

Occupancy Expectations

A continued neutral outlook on expected occupancy levels. The index for occupancy levels increased slightly from 50 to 52. Despite the increase, the panelists continue in their expectation that occupancy levels will remain steady at current levels. As new buildings have been completed it takes some time for the market to absorb the new space. Over the last 2 years the occupancy index has been drifting downward towards a neutral expectation concerning the demand for space.

Land Price Expectations

Increases in land prices are expected to moderate. The panel’s outlook for land prices reveals an expectation that land prices will increase at a slower rate between now and spring 2018. The land price index has increased (become less pessimistic) for the third consecutive survey moving from 37 last fall to 40 this fall this spring. The low point for the index was recorded at 31 in the fall 2013 survey. This sentiment while still in pessimistic territory indicates an expectation that land prices will moderate their rate of increase during the next two years. Increasing land prices increase total project costs and are a hindrance to new development, making it more difficult to obtain financing and adequate returns for investors.

Building Material Price Expectations

Increases in the price of building materials are also expected moderate.  The spring 2016 survey reveals that for the fourth consecutive survey our panel continues to become less pessimistic about the rate of increase in price of building materials. The building material index moved from a strongly negative 32 to a somewhat less negative 37, reflecting the panel’s opinion that building material price increases are expected to moderate. Since building materials are a major cost component of any development project any improvement in prices will be favorable for future development.

Return on Investment Expectations

Investors return expectations remain unchanged over the next two years. The index for investor’s return expectations has increased slightly for the third consecutive survey at 48. Although this index value is slightly pessimistic, it is essentially neutral.  The consensus among survey respondents continues to indicate that investors expected returns will not change significantly in the next two years. Investors will continue to seek out quality investments but they are being much more diligent about how they price risk and evaluate return when considering their investment options.

Lending Expectations

More equity is expected to be required.  The index for the amount of equity required by lenders decreased significantly, falling from 51 in to 42. This indicates the panel’s strong belief that credit will be available for good projects but lenders will increase their equity requirements in the coming two years. The good news is that more equity should result in better rates and terms; however, the bad news is that in many cases equity is harder to find and more expensive than debt.

 Summary

To summarize the panel is expecting to see a continuation of the favorable market conditions for commercial real estate that we have been experiencing for the last 2 to 3 years, however there will be some differences as to why this will happen. The panel has moved from a positive to a neutral position on occupancy. With all of the new product coming on line it is expected that given a little time the market will be able to absorb all of the new space but while this happens occupancy rates will be depressed in the short run. Additionally, the panel expects to see continued rent growth, however, that growth will be at a slower rate as new product comes on line and is absorbed. Development efforts will be helped by an expected moderation in the rate of increase in land prices and building materials. The panel is also expecting to see lenders tighten their lending standards somewhat. That results in lower loan amounts and higher equity requirements on development projects. Higher equity requirements makes development more difficult since equity dollars are more expensive and using less debt financing tends to reduce the rate of return on a project. Overall, our panelists see continuing activity at or near present levels in most categories of commercial real estate during the next two years.

May 2016 Commercial Survey

Affordable Housing, Development, Economics, Home Prices, Housing, Housing Trends, Industry News, Investment Real Estate, Minneapolis / St. Paul Housing, Real Estate Trends, Residential Real Estate, Residential Real Estate Index, Twin Cities Real Estate

September’s Housing Market Key Benchmarks Running Well Ahead of Last Year

A new emerging build-to-rent trend coming soon to the Minneapolis/ St. Paul Market Market Report

Strong housing-market benchmarks – including home prices and the number of sales – have continued well into the fall season across the 13-county Twin Cities region, according to a monthly analysis conducted by the Shenehon Center for Real Estate at the University of St. Thomas’ Opus College of Business. Each month the center tracks the median price for three types of sales: nondistressed or traditional; foreclosures; and short sales (when a home is sold for less than the outstanding mortgage balance). In addition, it looks for trends in the market and creates a monthly composite index score by tracking nine data elements for those three types of sales.

In September 2015 the $230,000 overall median sale price of a single-family home was unchanged from August but is 6 percent higher than in September 2014. Likewise, compared to last year the number of closed sales was up 12.5 percent and the number of pending sales (homes that are sold but have not yet closed) was up 11.9 percent. Herb Tousley, director of real estate programs at the university, cites two factors that are keeping the sale prices up: above-average wage growth and a historically low number of homes on the market (down 15.5 percent in September compared to a year ago). “We are continuing in a sellers’ market,” he said. “Look for these trends to persist through October before the market settles down a bit during the holiday season.”

Sept 2105 Median Sale Price

Build To Rent – A New Trend Heading in our Direction?

 A lack of existing housing inventory, a relatively low number of new housing starts combined with a tight rental market is causing some builders to change their strategy; they are starting to build homes specifically for rental. This is a new trend that is beginning to appear in a number of markets across the country. According to the Wall Street Journal, 5.85 percent of the 535,000 single-family homes started in 2013 were built to rent. That number is expected to continue to increase over the next several years. This trend is being driven by the lack of a once-plentiful supply of existing distressed homes that could be purchased a deep discount, renovated and then converted into rental properties. “For the last several months the percentage of distressed sales in in the Twin cities has been less than 9 percent,” Tousley said. “And that means there have been few distressed homes available.”

Builders are building three- and four-bedroom homes specifically to rent to families. They can select durable materials and interior finishes that can withstand increased wear and tear. And since these homes are new, expenses like repairs and maintenance will be much lower than comparable older, existing housing. “Some builders are selling these homes to institutional buyers as a way to sell homes in a hurry that allows them to keep their crews busy and cash coming in the door,” Tousley said. “In some cases, these homes are being sold in bulk to institutional buyers at an 8 percent to 10 percent discount. In tight rental markets like ours, investors believe that continued rent growth and rising home values will allow them to reach their investment objectives.”

He said the build-to-rent trend is beginning to appear in several forms. Some investors are buying newly built homes from builders on lots in new subdivisions and in long-standing, established neighborhoods that are located in the same general geographical area. These large investors already own and rent homes that are scattered in different locations and they have the infrastructure in place to manage and care for the properties. In some cases developers are building entire rental communities that have three- and four-bedroom homes built with higher quality materials that will offer amenities similar to high-end apartments such as a club house, fitness center and resort-style pool area. Landscaping and exterior maintenance will be reduced where crews can mow all of the yards, plow snow and maintain the common areas on a large-scale basis.

“These communities would be attractive to a number of potential tenants,” Tousley said. “These homes would appeal to families who are new to the area and would like to get to know the market before they buy. This gives renters a chance to live in a nice neighborhood while they look for a home to purchase. Other renters would like to live in a high-quality neighborhood but don’t have the down payment required to purchase a home at this time. Some developers are offering these homes as an opportunity for renters to save for a down payment and build their credit until they can qualify for a mortgage. A rent-to-own concept could help potential buyers purchase a home in today’s tougher lending standards.” “While we haven’t seen build-to-rent activity yet in the Twin Cities, I wouldn’t be surprised to see this trend emerge here in the near future,” Tousley said.

The St. Thomas indexes.

Here are the Shenehon Center’s monthly composite index scores for September 2015. The index, which tracks nine data elements for the three types of sales (traditional, short sales and foreclosures), started in January 2005. For that month, the center gave each of the three indexes a value of 1,000.

The September 2015 index score for traditional sales was 1,114, down from the record-high 1,126 in August. The downturn is blamed, in part, on declines in the number of new listings and closed sales.

The September 2015 index score for short sales was 955, down from 975 in August. There were only 97 short sales in the 13-county Twin Cities region in September, representing 1.9 percent of total sales.

The September 2015 index score for foreclosures was 822, up from 818 in August. There were 333 foreclosure sales in September, representing 6.4 percent of total sales.

Sept 2015 UST Indices

More information online: The Shenehon Center’s charts and report for September can be found at http://www.stthomas.edu/business/centers/shenehon/research/default.html.

The index is available free via email from Tousley at hwtousley1@stthomas.edu.

 

Best of Real Estate Matters, Commercial Real Estate, Development, Green Building, Historic Tax Credits, Housing Trends, Investment Real Estate, Minneapolis / St. Paul Housing, Minnesota Real Estate Hall of Fame, Minnesota Real Estate Journal, Real Estate Programs, Real Estate Trends, Think Outside The Box, Twin Cities Real Estate, Urban Planning, UST Real Estate in the News

New Members of Minnesota Real Estate Hall of Fame Announced

The Minnesota Real Estate Hall of Fame, established in 2010 by the Shenehon Center for Real Estate at the University of St. Thomas Opus College of Business, will add three new members in a morning ceremony Thursday, Nov. 5th, at the Golden Valley Golf and Country Club.

Members of the Minnesota Real Estate Hall of Fame are chosen for their outstanding business performance, high standards of ethics and community activities. The three new members

Dan DolanWells Fargo

For more than 50 years, Dan Dolan has pursued a career in real estate. He was a leader in improving the professional and ethical standards in real estate and was an early promoter and employer of women in real estate sales. His real estate developments include the Evergreen Community, an upscale residential development in Woodbury; and the Oakdale Crossing Business Park.

Throughout his career, Dolan has been actively involved in boards and fundraising, including the merger of Cretin and Durham high schools, fund raising for the University of St. Thomas, and serving as King Boreas XLII in the 1978 St. Paul Winter Carnival. He may be eligible for retirement, but Dolan is just as passionate as ever about real estate development and continues to receive offers of employment in the industry.

Larry Laukka  

Since 1962, Larry Laukka has actively served in all  aspects of the real estate industry, but primarily in the building and development business. Laukka’s experience has included the design, development, financing, construction and marketing of more than 6,000 dwelling units and home sites throughout the greater Twin Cities community, and the management of approximately 3,000 owner-occupied townhomes and condominiums. His leadership roles include president and director of the Minneapolis Builders Association (MBA), senior life director of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and founder of the Minnesota Housing Institute (MHI), which served the real estate industry’s state-wide needs to commercially promote home ownership and legislative action.

In the 1960s, Laukka worked with The Near Northside Re-Development Agency, a community based organization established to guide the redevelopment of the near north side of Minneapolis. The agency focused on the growing need for market rate housing and led to the development of single-family housing, hailed as “The Suburb in the City.”  After being approached by Governer Wendell Anderson, Laukka helped develop the State Housing Finance Agency and chaired the Minnesota State Housing Code Advisory Board until a state-wide building code was in place. Most recently, he served on the Fairview Southdale Hospital board of trustees and chaired the development of its new Carl N. Platou Emergency Center opened August 2015.

James Solem

For more than 40 years, James Solem provided outstanding leadership and tireless work in real estate finance and public policy, supporting the development of rental and ownership housing for low and moderate income households. He was the executive director of the Minnesota State Planning Agency from 1970 to 1978, and served as commissioner of the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency from 1978 to 1994 – a position he was appointed to five times by three Minnesota governors. From 1994 to 2000, Solem was the regional administrator for the Metropolitan Council, leading the long-range planning for transit, wastewater, parks and community development in the seven-county metropolitan area.  From 2000 – 2006, at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA), he led a project to bring new ideas to the issues of affordable housing and regional growth.

Now retired from the Metropolitan Council, Solem is active with consulting and volunteer service. He is chairman of the board of the Community Reinvestment Fund and of the boards of Common Bond Housing Corporation and the Greater Minnesota Housing Fund. Throughout his career, Solem demonstrated an exceptional knowledge of operations and governmental polices, brought a high level of ethical standards to the real estate industry and championed those most in need.

The program is open to the public and the cost is $60. More information is available at http://www.stthomas.edu/centers/shenehon/minnesota-real-estate-hall-of-fame/

To register use the following link:    https://webapp.stthomas.edu/eventregistration/ust/register.jsp?eventcrn=B1973

The Minnesota Real Estate Hall of Fame now has 30 members. Previously named were:

  • 2010: Tony Bernardi, Lloyd Engelsma, Gerald Rauenhorst, William Reiling, Jim Ryan and Sam Thorpe Sr.
  • 2011: Robert Hoffman, Darrel Holt, Bernard Rice, Emma Rovick and five members of the Dayton family: Bruce and the late Douglas, Donald, Kenneth and Wallace.
  • 2012: David Bell, Robert Boblett Sr., Philip Smaby and Boyd Stofer.
  • 2013: Leonard Bisanz, Helen Brooks, Thomas Crowley, M.A. Mortenson Sr. and Kenneth Stensby.
  • 2014: George Karvel Ph.D., Cyril “Cy” Kuefler Sr., Jim Stanton

 

Architecture & Design, Development

Expansion and Renovation at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, MN

Last week, The Opus Group officially announced the full completion of a two-phased project involving a 41,500-square-foot expansion and renovation at St. Catherine University’s Aimee and Patrick Butler Center for Sports and Fitness in St. Paul, MN. Phase I, which went from May 2014 to August of the same year, was specifically about renovating approximately 10,000 square feet in Fontbonne Hall, thus transforming existing gymnasium space into additional classrooms and connecting building with the adjacent Butler Center. Phase II, which began construction in fall of 2014 and ended in January 2015, created 31,500 square feet of new space inside the Butler Center, featuring separate varsity locker rooms and lounge space, a cardio room with fitness equipment, a dance studio and a one-story, multipurpose training center and field house. In addition, The Opus Group redesigned the primary point of entry and also added an elevator in order to enhance both accessibility and security.

St. Catherine University’s Aimee and Patrick Butler Center for Sports and Fitness in St. Paul, MN (Source: The Opus Group)

St. Catherine University’s Aimee and Patrick Butler Center for Sports and Fitness in St. Paul, MN (Source: The Opus Group)

The ahead-of-schedule completion of phase II enabled St. Catherine University’s students, faculty and athletic department officials to have access to the new facilities right in time for the spring semester. Satisfied by the work results, St. Catherine University’s vice president and chief financial officer Tom Rooney stated “A strong collaborative working relationship between Opus and St. Kate’s was the key to reaching our goal of improving and creating new spaces in this nine million dollar project, which benefits our entire campus community”.

Development, Housing, Minneapolis / St. Paul Housing, Twin Cities Real Estate

New Minneapolis Apartment Building Plan

According to Finance & Commerce, Minneapolis-based Hunt Associates and Washington-based Weidner Apartment Homes teamed up and presented on Thursday, June 18th, 2015 preliminary plans for a new six-story Minneapolis apartment building expected to replace the existing building on the 1.7-acre site which is currently home to the nonprofit Minnesota AIDS Project.

The Minnesota AIDS project building, at 1400 Park Ave. S. in Minneapolis, could be torn down late this year or early next year. (Staff photo: Bill Klotz)

The Minnesota AIDS project building, at 1400 Park Ave. S. in Minneapolis, could be torn down late this year or early next year. (Staff photo: Bill Klotz)

The new building will also have two levels of below-ground parking along with significant amount of amenities, including an outdoor courtyard. Hunt added that the developers are working with the project architect BKV Group to create a design similar to what you might find near the University of Minnesota today, with upper floors that “bend in the same time as they stand out.” Located at 1400 Park Ave. S., the site seems to be at an attractive location given that it’s at five blocks southwest of the new Minnesota Vikings stadium and also near the Minneapolis Convention Center (About three blocks to the west, across Interstate 35W). The project is owned by Weidner while Hunt Associates would act as a fee developer.

Architecture & Design, Commercial Real Estate, Development, Industry News, International Real Estate, Think Outside The Box, Urban Planning

Rising Towers Escalate Need for Faster Lifts

 The following article by  was reposted from the current issue of Urban Land Magazine

December 1, 2014

Shanghai-tower_800

When Shanghai Tower opens as China’s tallest building next year, the 2,073-foot (632 m) tower will feature elevators capable of traveling 40.3 miles (64.8 km) per hour, or 59 feet (18 m) per second, a new milestone. That bests the 55.1 feet (16.8 m) per second achieved by the elevators in the current record holder, Taipei 101 in Taiwan, which was completed in 2004.

But Shanghai Tower likely will not hold the title as world’s fastest for long. Builders of the Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre, which is scheduled to open in 2016 in Guangzhou, China, have promised elevators capable of traveling 66 feet (20 m) per second, or 45 miles (72 km) per hour. The elevators will take passengers from the first floor to the 95th floor in about 43 seconds.

The question facing the industry today: how fast can elevators go without sacrificing comfort?

“This is a new day,” says Steve Edgett, partner in Edgett Williams Consulting Groups, which works on elevator designs. “We’re in uncharted territory.” Some analysts believe mankind may be close to the limits of elevator speeds using modern technology. “I think there is a limit, not to building, but what we can do efficiently,” says Johannes de Jong, head of technology for Finland-based Kone Elevators.

Kingdom_Tower_360

Saudi Arabia’s Kingdom Tower will feature the longest single elevator ride in a building, about 2,165 feet (660 m). (Kone Corporation)

The biggest obstacle for faster speeds is the variance in air pressure from the bottom to the top of tall buildings. A superfast elevator leaves no time for the body to adjust to the changes in pressure, similar to the effect experienced by divers surfacing too quickly in the ocean.

For elevators to go faster, something will have to be done to accommodate the human ear, which is extremely sensitive to pressure changes. Commercial jets typically take 20 to 30 minutes to descend from their highest altitude and help passengers adjust, yet earaches and complaints are still common. “One thing we cannot do is change the laws of physics,” de Jong says.

For the Guangzhou tower, Japanese tech firm Hitachi, which is building the elevators, will use a sophisticated control panel that can respond to “changes in atmospheric pressure correctly” to smooth the acceleration and deceleration process and “relieve the feeling of fullness in the ear as a result,” a company spokesperson says. This adjustment technology will reduce the abrupt pressure changes inside the elevator car, while special “active guide rollers” will compensate for even tiny lateral vibrations, Hitachi says.

But there is no guarantee the measures will provide a comfortable ride. Every person’s physiology is different; people with colds or earaches may be more susceptible to ear problems. At 66 feet (20 m) per second, even the slightest vibration will create a shock for passengers.

In Taipei 101 and other existing tall buildings, the elevators are usually set to descend much slower than they ascend in order to ease the ride. Nevertheless, passenger complaints are common. “At nine meters [30 feet] a second, I felt my ears pop,” Edgett says.

In the one-kilometer-tall (0.6 mi) Kingdom Tower under construction in Saudi Arabia—which likely will become the next “tallest building in the world”—Kone expects elevator speeds to peak at 33 to 41 feet (10 to 12.5 m) per second. “It’s up to the client,” de Jong says. “We have to show him how it feels.”

However, Kingdom Tower will feature the longest single elevator ride in a building, about 2,165 feet (660 m), using a new carbon fiber cable designed by Kone called UltraRope, which is dramatically lighter and stronger than steel cables.

Read the entire article at http://urbanland.uli.org/planning-design/rising-towers-escalate-need-faster-lifts/?utm_source=uli&utm_medium=eblast&utm_campaign=120114

 

 

Commercial Real Estate, Development, Economics, Industry News, Medical Office, Office Real Estate, Real Estate Trends, Uncategorized

Medical Offices Now Work as Timeshares

 The following article was reposted from Globe Street.com

By Carrie Rossenfeld | Orange County
 

Dopp-Grech: “The next step is for independent operators to offer this format without a specific hospital affiliation.”

IRVINE, CA—Like executive suites in the office market, shared medical space to accommodate multiple practices is being explored by medical landlords, Sonya Dopp-Grech, SVP/director of healthcare services for NAI Capital, tells GlobeSt.com exclusively. The concept allows for physician mobility and maximized use of the space.

“The healthcare industry is showing movement toward time-share concepts, allowing physicians to serve different geographical areas without the need to open additional offices,” says Dopp-Grech. “The concept has already been widely used by hospital groups to allow various specialists to reach out into the communities they serve. The next step is for independent operators to offer this format without a specific hospital affiliation.”

Medical landlords are beginning to explore this option with vacant or underperforming space in their buildings. The caveat is finding a responsible and reputable source to manage this type of space, which would look like a regular medical office with a common waiting area, receptionist and exam and treatment rooms. They may also contain a shared lab, equipment and other amenities.

“It’s like Regus does in the general-office market,” says Dopp-Grech. “Doctors go in and out and don’t need private offices so much anymore. They have their laptops and they see patients, but this way they can see patients at all ends of the county and don’t need to find a long-term lease in each location. It makes great sense, since the way of the future is consolidations.”

The concept makes sense for smaller independent practices or those who want to combine with a larger group. From the landlord perspective, if one is faced with vacant space, this presents another way to fill it with medical tenants.

As GlobeSt.com reported in January, consolidation is the keyword for medical practices today as they search for operating efficiencies. Since healthcare is moving away from the hospital setting into more of a retail environment, this consolidation presents challenges for larger medical practices seeking space to accommodate their needs.

One solution has been for larger groups to lease retail space that formerly held sizable stores such as Barnes & Noble, Dopp-Grech told GlobeSt.com. As GlobeSt.com reported earlier, as healthcare moves toward retail settings, many retail landlords are finding themselves for the first time involved in build-outs and tenant improvements for medical practices. While this trend is welcome among most landlords, they may not be prepared for the high cost of some of these improvements, according to Dopp-Grech.

“Consolidation is occurring because health systems want to make everything efficient for the groups,” says Dopp-Grech. “Smaller groups won’t be able to survive with malpractice insurance [and other costs]. So they’re consolidating and going into larger retail buildings, such as a Barnes & Noble that got vacated.”

 Follow this link to Globe Street: http://www.globest.com/
 
 About Our Columnist
Carrie Rossenfeld
Carrie Rossenfeld is a reporter for the West Coast region of GlobeSt.com and Real Estate Forum. She was a trade-magazine and newsletter editor in New York City for 11 years before moving to Southern California in 1997 to become a freelance writer and editor for magazines, books and websites. Rossenfeld has written extensively on topics ranging from intellectual-property licensing and giftware to commercial real estate. She recently edited a book about profiting from distressed real estate in a down market and has ghostwritten a book about starting a home-based business.Email
Commercial Real Estate, Development, Economics, Housing, Housing Trends, Industry News, Multifamily, Real Estate Trends, Residential Real Estate, Uncategorized

Developer Makes a Bet on Prairie-Home Boom

Related Paid $300 Million for Apartments in Texas, North Dakota

 This article was reposted from the Wall Street Journal on March 18, 2014. It was written by Craig Karmin and Eliot Brown

A two-bedroom recreational vehicle at North Dakota Housing’s RV Park in Watford City rents for $2,350 a month.  -North Dakota Housing

Related Cos., the developer best known for luxury condominiums and big commercial projects, is turning its sights to low-slung apartments on the North Dakota and Texas prairie, where a shortage of housing tied to the energy boom is allowing landlords to command some of the highest rents in the country.

The company, run by Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross, last week paid around $300 million for 20 apartment complexes with 3,000 units in Midland and Odessa, Texas, according to people familiar with the transaction. It also is in advanced talks for a deal on an existing project in North Dakota’s Bakken region, and plans to raise up to $300 million for a fund focused on shale-rich communities from desert areas near the Mexican border to the Appalachian basin in the East, the people said.

Mr. Ross is following a small band of investors, including private-equity giant KKR & Co. and real-estate firm Westport Capital Partners, into the residential and commercial markets of new and resurgent energy towns a world away from the cities and suburbs where they usually build or buy. They are drawn by rents that would seem more reasonable in Midtown Manhattan and Silicon Valley, the result of almost nonexistent unemployment and low supply.

A two-bedroom apartment in Williston, N.D., for example, can go for $3,000 a month, or more. In nearby Watford City, North Dakota Housing LLC rents a two-bedroom trailer for $2,350 a month. The same rent could fetch a spacious luxury apartment in cities like Las Vegas or Phoenix, or a studio in new towers in New York.

“We think it’s a unique opportunity,” says Justin Metz, managing principal of Related’s fund-management group.

The boomtowns in Texas have been around since oil-drilling rushes of previous decades, but those in North Dakota began sprouting about five years ago as energy companies started to pull oil and natural gas from shale-rock formations through a process known as fracking. Their populations have skyrocketed, overwhelming the existing housing stock. Many workers continue to be housed in barrack-like “man-camps.” While riding a boom is risky, investors point out that they are getting compensated with high yields. For example, Related is expecting the initial annual income from the apartment portfolio it purchased last week will be more than 10% of the purchase price, according to people familiar with the matter.

By comparison, investors on average are getting a yield of about 6% on rental-apartment acquisitions and that figure can dip below 4% in major cities like New York, according to data firm Real Capital Analytics. “Typically, pricing gets ahead of real-estate fundamentals,” says Mr. Metz of Related, referring to high employment and rapid economic growth in the oil and gas-rich regions. “Here you have strong real estate fundamentals and pricing hasn’t caught up with it yet.”

Still, some analysts are warning that job growth eventually will level off and begin to fall after the initial labor-intensive effort of drilling wells is complete. Employment in the rapidly growing petroleum sector of the North Dakota Williston Basin, for instance, is projected to rise from 14,153 in 2009 to more than 53,000 in 2020, before falling to 40,000 by 2030, according to North Dakota State University’s Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics.

Meanwhile, developers already are adding to supply, causing Moody’s Investors Service last month to issue a report warning that rents in North Dakota boomtowns are “well above sustainable” levels. “It really intrinsically doesn’t make sense for a town with no physical barriers to entry to command the same rents as New York or San Francisco,” says Tad Philipp, director of commercial real-estate research at Moody’s Investors Service.

Not all bets have been winners. For example, Flathead Glacier Group LLC, a Bozeman, Mont., real-estate company, defaulted on a $24 million loan backed by 134 rental apartments in Williston and Watford City just four months after it was sold into a mortgage bond, according to Trepp LLC. Last week, Trepp reported the loan went to 90 days delinquent from 60 days. Inquiries to Flathead were directed to a firm run by loan sponsor John Dunlap, who didn’t respond. But a spokeswoman for Halliburton Co. confirmed that it terminated its lease for 40 units owned by Flathead in August when Halliburton completed construction of housing for its workers in Williston.

Still, many investors and planners believe it could be years more before supply catches up with demand, pushing rents down. For some of the early real-estate investors in the latest boom, cash is pouring in as rents rise. Average rents in Williston have risen from about $1,000 a month in 2009 to nearly $2,500 at the end of 2012, the latest available data, according to the Williston Regional Economic Development Corp.

KKR was one of the first big-name investors to show up, announcing a 164-acre master-planned community in Williston in 2012. The private-equity firm expects to complete this summer eight rental apartment buildings on the site. The apartments have been coming to market gradually and KKR officials say they are leasing 20 to 25 a week. KKR and its partners are spending about $150 million to build the apartments, and to prepare vacant lots that they are selling separately to home builders.

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Write to Craig Karmin at craig.karmin@wsj.com and Eliot Brown at eliot.brown@wsj.com