Home Prices, Housing

4th of July Real Estate Matters

Last evening, I watched the Delano fireworks. The show was excellent and the lightning made it even more interesting. It got me thinking about the past, and how 10 years ago, my family would get there 5 or 6 hours early to get prime sitting/parking real estate to see fireworks up close. Whereas, now, as long as we can see the fireworks it is a good spot. To be honest, the effort to get a good spot doesn’t have the same value as before.

Although, my preferences have changed, finding a spot to park a car or a lawn chair seems like it is even harder to find than 10 years ago. Granted, Delano hosts one of the oldest annual 4th of July festivals in the state, the town has grown substantially, and they don’t seem to ever hold back on the fireworks. A couple years back at the 100th anniversary, the Delano fireworks show had a finale “end-of-show” firework which my friends and I felt from 10 miles away. I digress. Despite my own preferences, people want prime viewing real estate to watch the fireworks up close, but there isn’t enough. As the effort [price] to acquire the sitting space rises, people, like my family, have decided to locate farther away.

To the point, the fireworks show reminded me of the current housing market. Low housing inventories with high demand. From a simple economic standpoint, people should be entering the market as the price rises, but like the fireworks show there is an intangible element to housing. Individually, we all value these intangible attributes of living differently. For example, some people in a median priced house may value geography and education opportunities higher than the house alone, and they may not be able to find a home with similar geography and education. Therefore, they do not enter the market keeping inventory low.

FRED reports the average American family can afford a mortgage. So, why are we not seeing more sales? Can people not afford or not willing to pay current prices? Could it be trends changing social norms (Home ownership)? Whatever the reason, it will be interesting to see at what point housing inventories truly begin to climb.

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