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literature

Recently Read

Pack a book for Spring Break!

I recently went to a poetry reading by Minnesota Poet Laureate, Joyce Sutphen, and she read one of my favorite poems of hers, called “What to Pack” (click on the link to hear her reading it).

It got me thinking: Spring Break is coming soon, and I need to figure out what book I’m going to read to keep me busy while everyone is off-campus!  It’s a good thing I work at OSF Library…

Are you going somewhere for Spring Break this year?

Don’t forget to pack a book from the libraries’  Leisure Reading collection!

The Leisure Reading collection includes “popular fiction and materials generally not considered scholarly or appropriate for an academic library’s permanent collection.”  Translation: it has great books that are fun to read when you are lying on the beach (or lying on your couch pretending you are lying on the beach!).

You can browse the collection on the main floors of both OSF and Keffer Libraries, or see a complete list of leisure reading titles in the CLICnet catalog. Items are available to current UST students, faculty, staff, and Friends of the OSF Library, and they can be checked out for three weeks – perfect for that spring break siesta!

Have a fun and safe Spring Break!

News & Events, Recently Read

Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest results

The winning entries of the 2010 Bulwer-Lytton contest are available at now .  In case you are blissfully ignorant of this event, it is a “whimsical literary competition that challenges entrants to compose the opening sentence to the worst of all possible novels.”

 Here’s this year’s grand prize winner (to use the term loosely):

“For the first month of Ricardo and Felicity’s affair, they greeted one another at every stolen rendezvous with a kiss–a lengthy, ravenous kiss, Ricardo lapping and sucking at Felicity’s mouth as if she were a giant cage-mounted water bottle and he were the world’s thirstiest gerbil.”

Yikes!

 If you are a glutton for punishment, the 2009 results can found at http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/2009.htm , and all the grand prize winners since 1983 are at http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/lyttony.htm.

(reposted without permission from an email from Cathy Lutz–hope she’ll forgive me)

News & Events

Zora Neale Hurston event Friday, February 19

Friday, February 19, 2010
O’Shaughnessy Room, O’Shaughnessy-Frey Library (Room 108)

Reception: 3-3:30pm

Performance: Jump at the Sun – The Life and Times of Zora Neale Hurston: 3:30-4:30pm

Question and Answer Session: 4:30-5pm

Zora WindowSigma Tau Delta, the English Honor Society, invites the UST community for an informal reception celebrating the dedication of a new stained glass medallion in honor of Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), author of Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937).  Hurston was a ground-breaking essayist and fiction writer closely associated with the Harlem Renaissance. Her work was instrumental in breaking down barriers of race and gender during a turbulent period of American history.

This will be the first stained glass in the library that honors a woman author and the first to recognize a writer of color.  A home for this work of art has not yet been officially determined but it will most likely be suspended in one of the west-facing windows on the first floor of the library.

The library staff is thrilled and grateful for the work of the English Honor Society and department on suggesting and raising the funds for this new work of art.

In addition to the reception, there will also be a 55-minute performance of Buffy Sedlachek’s Jump at the Sun: The Life and Times of Zora Neale Hurston that begins at 3:30pm. This Jungle Theater production features Twin Cities actress and singer Regina Williams as Zora,  Stories of Hurston’s idyllic hometown of Eatonville, tall tales she collected during her travels in the rural South, and her struggle to maintain her unique voice as a writer despite criticism from the male literati of the Harlem Renaissance all emerge over the course of this performance. The show also includes original music by local composer Roberta Carlson. A short question and answer period will follow.

Jump