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Business & Economics

Business & Economics, Database Highlights & Trials, Libraries

Database trial: Simmons Local Consumer Insights

We now have a trial for Simmons Local Consumer Insights, as an addition to our Simmons OneView subscription (we are limited to 5 simultaneous users.) Simmons OneView provides data on adult U.S. consumers based on national surveys, and covers a wide variety of products, brands, and services. (There’s more information on how to use Simmons OneView on our Simmons OneView library guide.)

The Local Consumer Insights lets you view this information for all of the U.S.’s 209 Nielsen media markets, or DMAs (we are in the Minneapolis-St. Paul DMA.) Once you’ve logged in, to get the local data, click on the Study tab, then choose the area/DMA that you want.

Simmons Local Consumer Insights

Wondering about local pizza chain preferences? Let’s compare Domino’s and Pizza Hut.

Simmons Local Domino’s & Pizza Hut

This trial runs through November 17, 2017. Please send your comments on this resource to Marianne Hageman.

Business & Economics, Database Highlights & Trials, News & Events

Simmons OneView trial

We now have a trial for Simmons OneView – just click OK when it says we have no challenge question.) Simmons is a database of consumer demographic information (formerly known as the Simmons Study of Media and Markets); it provides national survey data from the Simmons National Consumer Study and the National Hispanic Consumer Study. These studies include demographic and psychographic characteristics, including attitudes and shopping habits, of product users. They have several YouTube tutorials; a good one to start with is “Create, Export & Save a CrossTab.”

We are comparing this to MRI University Reporter. A big difference between them is that unlike MRI, Simmons OneView has no “canned” reports. Users can choose their variables, which makes it more powerful, but there is more of a learning curve.

Our trial to Simmons OneView runs through November 17. Please send your comments on this resource to Marianne Hageman.

simmonsoneview

Business & Economics, Database Highlights & Trials, News & Events

Trial – eMarketer

This month we are trialing a marketing and advertising resource called eMarketer. It provides market data, statistics, and analysis including trends in e-business, mobile, social media, and online advertising. The data can be used to look at consumer behavior and market size. eMarketer includes articles, analyst reports, and statistical tables which can be downloaded to Excel for further analysis.

emarketer

This trial runs through 10/27/2016. Please send your comments on this resource to Marianne Hageman.

Art, Business & Economics, English, Latin America, Libraries, Modern Languages, News & Events, Science

Welcome Back!

Welcome back to campus, everyone! It was so fun to cheer on the class of 2018 as they marched through the arches yesterday, and today it’s great to see the Quad filled with smiling faces as we all reconnect and get geared up for a wonderful academic year.

We hope you had a fun summer! Things were busy around here at the library and, as usual, we have some fun news to share.

As you gear up for your fall research projects, remember to check out our handy Subject Guides – what I like to call handy “mini library websites” geared specifically towards your course and subject content (and I’m not making that up – we  work with your professors to make sure we have what you need to do your assignments!).

We’re also happy to report that Summon, our popular library search engine, has received an upgrade that we hope will make it easy to use.  Some highlights we’ve heard students liking already include: recommendations of subject specialists based on what you’re searching, automatic breakdown of content by type (like Google does), and more.  Check it out and let us know what you think! 

We’ve also added many more online resources, including these favorites of mine:

  • ASTM Standards and Engineering Digital Library – a collection of industry-leading standards and technical engineering information
  • Digitalia Hispánica – database of e-books and e-journals in Spanish and English, with access to some of the most renowned publishers in Spain and Latin America
  • Early English Books Online – primary source collection featuring English-language books, pamphlets, tracts and ephemera printed between 1473 – 1700
  • Literature Online (“LION”) – criticism and reference resources as well as full text of poetry, drama, and prose fiction from the 8th century to the present day
  • Nature – we have expanded our subscription to the journal “Nature” to include archives going back to 1987

And, of course, we have much more!

As I like to joke, you can stick a quarter in me and I’d go on and on about all of the wonderful resources we have here at the UST Libraries, but I know we’re all busy so I’ll stop here.  Instead, make an appointment with your favorite librarian today find out more about what we have to help you with your research today!

Business & Economics, Database Highlights & Trials

Job-hunting? Company information search tips

Target Corporation SWOT Analysis

Target Corp. SWOT Analysis


As the temperatures warm up and we move through spring, our thoughts turn fondly to – well, for many students, you’re thinking about job-hunting. You’re thinking about potential employers, maybe you have some interviews lined up. You want to know more about a company as a potential employer, and you want to go beyond what you find on the company’s website and some quick web searching. If you’re a business student, you’ve probably done a good deal of company research for class projects. But if you haven’t done it recently, or aren’t a business student, here are some tips and suggestions.

  • Get a good overview. Business Insights: Essentials and Business Source Premier are great places to check for a basic overview of a public company (one that sells stock or other registered securities to the public.) This can include a description of the company, financial information, and news stories. BSP, BIE, and OneSource Global Business Browser include SWOT reports, which summarize Strengths and Weaknesses of a business, and the Opportunities and Threats it faces in the business environment.
  • Focus your search. BSP and ABI/INFORM Trade & Industry each have a way to search for items about a company that’s more precise than keyword searching. This helps a lot with companies like Target or even Google, whose names are part of daily life. (The word “target,” for example, can refer to target markets, target dates, target-based pay, and of course target practice.) In BSP, you can use the pull-down menu to search for Target as a “company entity,” to get articles specifically about Target the company. And in ABI, you can search for Target as a “company/organization.”
  • Find those private companies, too. As mentioned in an earlier blog post, PrivCo is our newest business resource, covering privately-held companies that average around $50,000,000.00 in annual revenue. For smaller companies, ReferenceUSA is a “business phone book” covering 24 million U.S. businesses. In the Custom Search, you can look for companies by name, business type, business size, location, and more.
  • Don’t forget the news. Yeah, you can find news on the web, but some precision searching can help here as well. ProQuest Newsstand, like ABI, lets you search for articles on a “company/organization.” That helps focus your search in local news sources, like the Star Tribune or Pioneer Press, as well as major papers from other cities (the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, and the Los Angeles Times, just to drop a few names.) And my good friend BizLink has full-text coverage of 40 regional business journals, including the Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal and business journals from Atlanta, Denver, Milwaukee, Portland, and Silicon Valley. It’s a great place to search for information on local or regional companies, and you get that local perspective that you don’t find in national sources.
  • Be sure to check our career and employment resources guide as part of your job search. And good luck!

    Business & Economics

    Harvard Business Review removes full access to selected articles

    It has become a depressingly common question this semester at the reference desk. I am asked why a permanent link to an article is coming up with an error message, or a user sees this message on an article she wants for a class.

    harvard

     

    I look at the citation and sure enough the answer is staring at me right in the face. The Harvard Business Review is a long standing, respected publication, that covers a wide range of business topics and articles are assigned readings in many undergraduate and graduate classes. Business Source Premier is the only database at UST that provides the electronic access to the Harvard Business Review starting from 1922 up until the present issue. I remember very clearly in the early 2000’s when the UST libraries decided to to make the switch from our then full text business article database, ABI INFORM to Business Source Premier from the vendor Ebsco.  The librarians debated the merits of both products, we conducted surveys, and finally one of the main reasons we switched was because of the full text access to HBR that we knew our users wanted.

    Fast forward to August 1st 2013 when the publishers of HBR started to block full access to their most popular articles like the one you see above.  Professors can no longer link to these articles from their Blackboard page, and while users can view the articles when they find them in Business Source Premier, they can no longer print or save the articles in front of them.  There is no established list of these 500 articles, users will have to just cross their fingers when they click on an article from HBR that the article they want is not on that mysterious list.

    This issue with Harvard goes beyond UST, and it is not going unnoticed.  The Chronicle of Education published a very comprehensive article describing the circumstances and potential impact of this situation, while business and reference library associations issued their own response to Harvard’s policy.   Recently I shared an article with an OCB faculty member who was not able to link to an HBR article and she replied ‘I would not want to be on the wrong side of librarians.’  I was very flattered by her response and gratified that she perceived librarians as facilitating access to information.  So when this access is denied for whatever reason, then yes, you do not want to be on that wrong side.

    Business & Economics

    Industry information: new and improved!

    “New and improved” is one of those standard tag lines in business, but we really have seen some cool industry stuff lately in our business resources. Fans of IBISWorld, that great source for mid-level industry overviews, may have noticed an increasing number of OD reports. Now these aren’t “ODD” reports, they’re “OD,” which stands for On Demand. Businesses order these reports from IBISWorld and, once they’re delivered to the client, IBIS can resell them. There are about 600 of them now, in addition to the 700+ regular reports in IBIS. St. Thomas pays a little extra for them, and they’re worth it. Besides 3D Printer Manufacturing (OD4428) and Ethnic Supermarkets (OD4333), where else would you look for reports on Sports Video Game Publishing (OD4860) and my personal favorite, Chocolate Stores (OD5339)? One can only say that the revenue outlook is Sweet.

    IBISWorldChocolate2

    Another resource near and dear to the hearts of business researchers is ABI/INFORM Trade & Industry. Despite its less-than-glamorous name, ABI Trade is a great source for high fashion news, as well as market trends, and product announcements of all sorts. This is due to its great coverage of trade journals, which is a publication covering, and intended to reach, a specific industry or type of business. ABI also has a bunch of industry reports, which until recently have not been easy to find. But now you can search them more easily through ABI’s Data & Reports tab, or best of all, browse them through the Browse tab:

    ABITrade1

    Here’s an example, Food and Drink:

    AmericasFoodandDrink

    As we move toward project deadlines and the end of fall semester, keep a warm place in your heart for industry overviews. Well, maybe not. But keep them in mind for your research projects, and spring job-hunting.

    Business & Economics, News & Events

    UST Faculty Publications Getting Some Love Nationally

    Kudos to the OCB faculty, whose publications are among the most downloaded this month from the Management Sciences and Quantitative Methods Commons.  Earlier this year, UST faculty works have also ranked highly in the Feminist Philosophy Commons, the Clinical & Medical Social Work Commons, and the Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics Commons. Our congratulations to all involved!

    The Commons are part of a national network of universities that provide access to faculty research via an institutional repository.  UST’s institutional repository is called UST Research Online.  Faculty can arrange to upload and display their published or unpublished scholarly work in their department’s section of the site. In addition, the repository can be used to publish online journals (like the UST Law Journal), and is also used by several programs for electronic publishing of graduate student theses and dissertations.

    We’re sometimes asked why faculty should bother making their work available through UST’s repository, especially if it’s already been published in a peer-reviewed journal.  The answer is simple: it multiplies the visibility of the articles.

    The citation (and article copy or link) is published in UST Research Online, and Digital Commons, which powers our repository, aggregates and makes available works from all participating institutions via their Digital Commons network, from which the works are organized into disciplinary collections (like those linked above) available for searching and browsing. Perhaps the paper gets published in a journal, and also in one or more disciplinary sites like SSRN, etc.  Then the search engines crawl these sites, discover the articles and the connections between them, which in turn raises their placement in online search results.

    Fame, fortune, and scholarly ninja status are sure to follow. 

    BTW, OCB faculty aren’t the only ones who can get in on this action: the repository is open to all faculty members.  For more information, contact your department chair or Linda Hulbert, Associate Director for Collection Management Services at the Libraries.

    Management Sciences

    Business & Economics, Database Highlights & Trials, Services

    Featured Librarian: Marianne Hageman

    Welcome to new series here on the blog: the Featured Librarian!Marianne

    We figured it would be fun for everyone to know who we are and, along the way, learn a bit about what we love about the place we work.  First up is Marianne Hageman, a business librarian who works mainly on the St Paul campus.

    Here are some answers she gave in a recent interview:

    1. What departments are you a liaison for?
      I’m a liaison librarian for business, specializing in (but not limited to) marketing resources. I’m also liaison for the advertising and PR side of COJO.
    2. What resource – in your topic area – do you think is the coolest?
      That’s hard, since we have so many cool resources. But I’ll give a huzzah to MRI+ Mediamark Reporter, the demographics database.
    3. What’s one cool thing that resource can do?
      MRI+ can give you information on who buys what, and then ties that to different characteristics, including what magazines people read and the kinds of television programs they watch. There’s a separate section for teen data, and it’s pretty cool (or creepy, depending on how you look at it) to see what teens like to eat for breakfast.
    4. Who is your favorite author?
      I can’t limit it to just one! A favorite author from childhood is Lucy Maud Montgomery, author of the “Anne of Green Gables” books and so much more. She’s a great comfort read. A favorite British author, recently deceased, is Diana Wynne Jones, who wrote “Howl’s Moving Castle” (made into a film by Hayao Miyazaki (it’s a great film, but the book is better.) A favorite Minnesota author is Lois McMaster Bujold; I’m working on reading all of her books this year. If you ask me tomorrow, I might have a different list.

    Marianne can be contacted for research assistance or classroom sessions by email, or by phone at (651) 962-5404.  See more information about her, and schedule a research consultation, on the library website.