Libraries, Media/Music Collections, O'Shaughnessy-Frey Library

Something to be Thankful For

By Sophia Wolf

The classic Thanksgiving tale is that of collaboration and friendship between the Pilgrim settlers and the Wampanoag tribe. However, there is much more to the history of this iconic American holiday than simply this, so take the opportunity to learn more and explore the multiple perspectives of those who took part in the first Thanksgiving. As students, faculty, and staff take a well-deserved break from courses, be sure to check out the resources available at the Music & Media Collections to find the perfect film to enjoy with your Thanksgiving leftovers!

The Pilgrims
Call Number: F 68 .P55 2015
Commemorated each year at Thanksgiving, no chapter in American history has been more clouded in myth, legend, and venerable cliché than the story of the Pilgrims. This film explores the story of a small group of English Separatists whose determination to worship God as they saw fit planted the seeds of the American dream.

We Still Live Here
Call Number: PM 2544 .A86 2010
The Wampanoag are celebrated at Thanksgiving as the Indians who saved the Pilgrims from starvation, but their linguistic heritage remained largely forgotten until Jessie Little Doe Baird discovered hundreds of documents written in their ancient language. Her efforts, which led to the reclamation of the Wampanoag language and culture, are explored in this documentary film.

We Shall Remain: America Through Native Eyes
Call Number: E 77 .W47 2009
When Europeans arrived in North America, they encountered the Native people. Throughout history, Native peoples resisted expulsion from their lands and fought the extinction of their culture. Follow Native American history from the Wampanoags of New England in the 1600s, to the bold new leaders of the 1970s who harnessed the momentum of the Civil Rights movement. Spanning almost four hundred years, this three-part documentary series tells the story of pivotal moments in U.S. history from the Native American perspective.

Media/Music Collections, Music, News & Events

Music Resources at the Library

As students, faculty, and staff visit the Music & Media Collections at OSF to browse, they often limit themselves to only the DVD collection. However, there are also many music resources available for your use. A wide range of genres are found both in the physical CD collection and the multiple music streaming services accessible through the library website. Music streaming services have both audio and visual recordings, music documentaries, dance performances, and more. Many of the streaming services also offer the option to create music playlists for personal or classroom use. Check out some of the great resources for music, as well as learn how to find them yourself!

Naxos Music Library
Naxos Music Library streaming audio database offers hundreds of thousands of tracks of classical, jazz, world, and folk music. Search for music by composer, artist, period, year of composition, instrument, label, duration, mood, or genre. Added features include composer biographies, musical terms glossaries, and work analyses.

Music Online: Smithsonian Global Sound
Smithsonian Global Sound streaming audio database has more than 40,000 individual tracks of music, spoken word, and natural and human-made sounds. Included are readings of literary and dramatic works, historic speeches, language instruction, natural sounds, environmental and mechanical sounds, sound effects, children’s music, and traditional music from virtually everywhere in the world.

Medici.TV
A streaming music video database covering over 1,500 films in high definition with the best of classical music from Baroque to Contemporary music, including: concerts, operas, ballets, archival documents, portraits of artists and composers, master classes, conductors in rehearsals. There are over 100 live broadcasts every year from leading concert halls and classical music festivals.

By Sofia Wolf

Libraries, Media/Music Collections, News & Events, O'Shaughnessy-Frey Library

Native American Heritage Month Videos

By Sofia Wolf

Did you know that November is Native American Heritage Month? This month provides an opportunity to celebrate Native American culture and traditions. We can also use it to raise awareness about the unique challenges facing Native American communities, both in the past and present. There are many resources offered by the Music & Media Collections to learn more and appreciate the rich Native American history in the state of Minnesota.

Ojibwe Music from Minnesota: A Century of Song for Voice and Drum
Call Number: M 1669 .O45 1997

Hear traditional Ojibwe music, sung in both English and Ojibwa, with early recordings as dating from 1899-1910, as well as more recent field recordings.

Manoomin: A Minnesota Way of Life
Call Number: E99.C6 M3 2005

This documentary is a part of the campaign to prohibit the introduction of genetically-engineered wild rice in the State of Minnesota. A group of Ojibwe people voice their opinions, providing contrast between scientific progress and the rights of indigenous people to protect their food source, biodiversity, and way of life.

The Woodlands: The Story of the Mille Lacs Ojibwe
Call Number: E99.C6 W6 2000

This film explores the 400-year history and culture of Minnesota’s Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Native Americans through narration, historical footage, music, and personal interviews with tribal elders.

Libraries, News & Events, O'Shaughnessy-Frey Library

“The Smoke of London” author reading and book signing

Author Will Cavert

Reading and Book Signing  

William Cavert

Monday, November 13, 2017

7:00 pm  O’Shaughnessy-Frey Library, Room 108

London in the early modern period was one of the world’s most polluted cities impacting everything from the health of its citizens to how the politics and culture developed during this time.

Dr. Will Cavert, assistant history professor at the University of St. Thomas, will speak about his recently published work: The Smoke of London: Energy and Environment in the Early Modern City which takes a closer look at how the people who lived and traveled to London adapted to London’s “smoky air.”  London in the early modern period was one of the world’s most polluted cities impacting everything from the health of its citizens to how the politics and culture developed during this time.

Awards Received:

  • The John Ben Snow Prize from the American Conference on British Studies
  • The Whitfield Prize from the Royal Historical Society
  • The Turku Prize from the European Society for Environmental History and the Rachel Carson Center of the University of Munich.

About the Author:

Dr. Cavert is a historian of Britain during the early modern period, c. 1500-1800, with research interests in urban and environmental history. He is the author of The Smoke of London: Energy and Environment in the Early Modern City, published in 2016 by Cambridge University Press, as well as studies in The Journal of British StudiesUrban History, and The Global Environment.

He came to the University of St. Thomas in 2014 from The University of Cambridge where he was a post-doctoral fellow at Clare College, having taken a Ph.D. at Northwestern University in 2011 and an M.A. at Loyola University Chicago. Before that he completed his undergraduate studies at Carleton College, and is a native Minnesotan. He teaches classes on The Modern World Since 1550 (HIST 112), British social and political history, early modern European history, the history of science, and the history of climate, environmentalism, and natural disasters.

Reading is free and open to all – books will be available for purchase – refreshments provided!

Latin America, Libraries, Media/Music Collections, News & Events, O'Shaughnessy-Frey Library

Day of the Dead Documentaries

By Sofia Wolf

As many people celebrate Halloween today, another holiday is being celebrated: Día de los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead. This holiday is celebrated throughout Mexico, particularly in the central and southern regions of the country, where the celebration originated. Day of the Dead is also observed in other regions where people with Mexican ancestry live, especially in the United States. This multi-day celebration, which takes place from October 31st -November 2nd, is a day of remembrance for loved ones and a celebration of their lives.

If you would like to learn more about the Day of the Dead or other holidays celebrated throughout the world, the Music & Media Collection has vast databases with documentaries about world religions, anthropology, sociology, language, art and many other subjects.

Below are links to several documentaries about Day of the Dead:

Festivals: Day of the Dead, Mexico

Mexico: Day of the Dead – My Americas

Day of the Dead: A Mexican Celebration

Libraries, News & Events

The Skeleton Dance

One of my seasonal favorites, as we prepare for Halloween: The Skeleton Dance.

“As we hear the chimes at midnight and bats flutter from a belfry; as a hound howls at the full moon and black cats brawl on the tombstones; Through the gloom, white skeletons pass, Running and leaping in their shrouds!” (Walt Disney Animation Studios).

The Skeleton Dance

News & Events

Halloween Films on Kanopy

By: Sophia Wolf

Looking for your fix of creepy cinema as Halloween approaches? Look no further than streaming services offered by the Music & Media Collections! Kanopy Films features nearly 200 horror films ranging from classic to foreign. This film database also has a large collection of science fiction & fantasy films to choose from.  With so many options, every thrill-seeker is sure to find a film to that will excite or fright.

Use the links below to go Kanopy Films to browse the selections or find some of the top picks from the Music & Media Collection to stream for your Halloween movie night:http://stthomas.kanopystreaming.com/

The Girl on the Train

Commuter Rachel Watson catches daily glimpses of a seemingly perfect couple, Scott and Megan, from the window of her train. One day, Watson witnesses something shocking unfold in the backyard of the strangers’ home. Unable to trust her own memory, Rachel begins her own investigation, while police suspect that she may have crossed a dangerous line.

Cronos

A film by artist Guillermo del Torro, antique dealer Jesus Gris stumbles across Cronos, a 400-year-old scarab that, when it latches onto him, grants him youth and eternal life — but also a thirst for blood. As Jesus enjoys his newfound vitality, he’s unaware that a dying old man, Dieter de la Guardia, has sent his nephew, Angel, to find the scarab and bring it back to him. But Jesus will not give immortality up easily, even risking the lives of those near to him.

House on Haunted Hill

This 1959 classic suspense film tells a spooky, campy tale of five strangers who are offered $10,000 each by an eccentric millionaire to spend the night in a haunted house. As the night develops, it becomes clear that these strangers’ selection was no accident–and a few have some diabolical schemes of their own!

 

Business & Economics, Database Highlights & Trials, Libraries

Database trial: Simmons Local Consumer Insights

We now have a trial for Simmons Local Consumer Insights, as an addition to our Simmons OneView subscription (we are limited to 5 simultaneous users.) Simmons OneView provides data on adult U.S. consumers based on national surveys, and covers a wide variety of products, brands, and services. (There’s more information on how to use Simmons OneView on our Simmons OneView library guide.)

The Local Consumer Insights lets you view this information for all of the U.S.’s 209 Nielsen media markets, or DMAs (we are in the Minneapolis-St. Paul DMA.) Once you’ve logged in, to get the local data, click on the Study tab, then choose the area/DMA that you want.

Simmons Local Consumer Insights

Wondering about local pizza chain preferences? Let’s compare Domino’s and Pizza Hut.

Simmons Local Domino’s & Pizza Hut

This trial runs through November 17, 2017. Please send your comments on this resource to Marianne Hageman.

News & Events

Hispanic Heritage Month

By Sofia Wolf

Did you know that September 15 to October 15 was National Hispanic Heritage Month? Although this month of celebration and recognition recently ended, there are still opportunities to learn about Hispanic culture. Here are some top film and music picks available for check out from the Music & Media Collection that celebrate Hispanic history, art, and culture!

Soul of the Tango: The Music of Astor Piazzolla

Call Number: M 3.1 P53 I56 1997 CD

Enjoy famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma playing the music of Astor Piazzolla in this Grammy Award-winning audio recording of traditional tango, infused with elements of jazz and classical music to create tango nuevo.

Chicano! The History of the Mexican-American Civil Rights Movement

Call Number: E 184 .M5 C4 2007 DVD

Learn the story of the Chicano movement, a civil rights movement to empower Mexican-Americans from 1965 to 1975.  It features the Chicano land struggle, Cesar Chavez and the UFW (United Farm Workers), the Los Angeles High School Walk-Outs, and the creation of the political party La Raza Unida.

The Long Road Home: The Odyssey of a Young Mayan Refugee From Guatemala

Call Number: F 1465.3 .S6 .L6 2002 DVD

A young Mayan man, Ricardo, fled his village in Guatemala to seek refuge in Mexico after government militias sought to destroy the resistance among the indigenous Maya people during the 1980s. After years in a refugee camp, he and his family crossed into the United States illegally seeking to join other family members. With the help of the “sanctuary movement,” the helped the family settles in Chicago, where they have an opportunity to tell their story.

Libraries, News & Events, O'Shaughnessy-Frey Library, Special Collections and Archives

Treasures from the Rare Book Collections – The Father Brown Mysteries

 

G. K. Chesterton’s fictional detective Father Brown is one of his most popular fictional creations. While initially produced as contributions to periodicals like the Pall Mall Magazine and McClure’s Magazine, the Father Brown stories soon gained great popularity and were later compiled into anthologies.

The hero of the stories  –  a short, squat, helpless appearing Catholic priest – was based on an actual priest, Father John O’Connor.  O’Connor was a lifelong friend of Chesterton and contributed to his conversion to the Catholic faith.

The original inspiration for the stories was Chesterton’s discovery of Fr. O’Connor’s profound knowledge of the depths of human depravity.  This came about through a conversation at a dinner party at which two Cambridge University students commented sarcastically about the naïveté of modern Christian priests.  Chesterton was struck by the paradox of the outwardly innocent appearance of his priest friend and a his friend’s deep understanding of sin and evil.

Father Brown’s detective pursuits are truly Chestertonian in that they shun the techniques of science and the undiluted rational powers of man. “Mere facts are commonplace,” says Father Brown. The sleuth depends on a deep knowledge of the human heart instead of methodical observation to solve mysteries.

The Chesterton-Belloc Collection housed the Department of Special Collections features over 1200 works by the English author G. K. Chesterton (1874 – 1936).     Among the materials in this collection, you will find a variety of editions of works from his Father Brown detective series.