Leadership

Health Care Can Learn from Other Business Models

 

The U.S. health care market, $3.2 trillion in 2015 (17.8% of GDP), is so complex and encumbered by multitudes of regulations, standards, payers, providers, and programs that it begs the question, can it learn something from other markets and businesses? Conventional wisdom on the part of health care leaders is that it likely would not.  People may be exhausted with the failure of the health care debate to move forward.  The frustration may be accompanied with the hope that health care’s 100-year-old business model will soon be positively disrupted by some emerging technology.  This denotes the failure of consensus building by our elected officials and leaders of our health care institutions.  Is it worth re-trying the dialogue, perhaps under different conditions?  Following are some thoughts built on the reopening the health care policy discussion.

  1. Domain development – The Twin Cities is renowned for the development of domains, i.e. organizational initiatives, which assist its citizens, corporations, and government to facilitate decision making across a spectrum of interests not readily addressed by traditional groups. The Citizens League, the Keystone Club, and the Downtown Council are examples of domains that influence decision-making that affects our local community by providing insight and perspective.  Is it possible to have a health care council that focuses on our local and regional needs, and common good?  Would such a council bring perspective to the needs of patients of all types and resources relative to the range of services available?  This council would not be a policy making body.  Rather it would provide a non-partisan, non-political format to provide thought leadership on health care issues.
  2. Participation – We have a number of programs that require participation such as drivers licensing, social security, property taxes, etc. Why is participation in the funding of health care (the mandate) considered such an intrusion by the government? How can a market function if its customers can elect not to participate until they need services and their expectation is that the cost will be as if they contributed all along? What is the role of government as a primary insurer of those most vulnerable to health care access problems? Minnesota’s health care insured market is in sharp decline, dropping from 293,000 enrolled in 2014 to 190,000 enrolled in 2017.  Are there any new models that address the participation issue?
  3. Market Focus – Is it possible to be successful in health care without serving an entire market? Conversely, is it possible to be successful if one provider can selectively choose its patients while another is required to care for all? Does it make sense to take a broader view of the range of patients across our community and the array of service providers, with a goal of aligning patient segments in the most cost-effective manner? Is there a community benefit to the intense competition for commercially-insured patients among our providers or does this result in needless and redundant investments at a high cost to patients? This is not a proposal to regulate the market, but rather one to level the playing field for providers and to create a true market.
  4. Create shared centers of excellence Can we find mechanisms to encourage the creation of specialty health care services that support all providers, improve access, and reduce or eliminate unneeded investment, without corrupting the marketplace? Can markets be created among health care service providers that optimize the sub-systems of health care, such as emergency care, coding, pharmacy, etc.
  5. Catalyze market strategy – Current health care strategy in our community appears to be singularly focused on the acquisition of patients, generating volume to offset the fixed costs of delivering health care; it is an evolving form of cannibalization that pits providers against each other without necessarily providing better access or more cost efficient operations. Are there strategic options appropriate to a competitive environment that make better use of resources and talent?

Health care management is continually seeking innovative solutions to care delivery processes.  The past few years have seen innovation focused on data technology.  We are proposing to insert the innovation process into the health care management system where systems’ constraints are addressed openly in light of possible trade-off and solutions.

 

Jack Militello and John McCall
St. Thomas Center for Innovation in the Business of Health Care

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