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Internships, Undergraduate English

My Internship with Arsenic Lobster

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This semester I was given the opportunity to be an intern for the Arsenic Lobster, an online poetry journal. I first came to learn of this internship opportunity from my creative writing professor, Salvatore Pane. He introduced me to the poetry journal and contacted them, finding out that there were opportunities for me to be an intern. I was eagerly interested to learn hands-on with them. The Arsenic Lobster’s strong energy and imagery throughout the journal caught my attention. Each poem felt different, yet each one still had a very powerful emotion visibly rooted within it. This has been a huge learning experience and is bringing me great excitement for my future as an English major.

The main focus of my internship is to review submissions, edit poetry, and send back my comments and edits to the editor, Susan Yount. Each week I have ten submissions forwarded to me. Each of these submissions ranges between three to five poems and can pertain to any topic chosen by the poet. The most common theme I have noticed within the poetry submissions is the obviously depicted passion in the writer’s voice. I find this to be very motivational for my own writing and this passion has deepened my appreciation for poetry. While editing, I look at the language utilized, the syntax structures, uses of enjambment, and other various details depending on the poem. This has also helped me in my own writing as I gain awareness about small and delicate details while reviewing submissions.

As a freshman, I took the Passports: Poetry Around the World class here at St. Thomas. When I went to take this class, I never thought that I would end up as an English major, and I definitely never imagined that I would be editing for a poetry journal two years later. Yet, here I am. That class, taught by Professor Mary Frandson, immensely expanded my knowledge on how to read and write poetry, preparing me to be able to look out for the intricate details hiding deep within a poem. Now I can read submissions and understand why one would benefit from a comma or enjambment, and how that effects the emotions and meaning of the poem’s story. The next English class I took at St. Thomas was Imaginative Writing. This class helped me to practice writing and give helpful feedback to my classmates on their work, which included poetry. Both of these courses have prepared me and guided me to feel confident in the work that I do for my internship.

somekindofshelterAlthough editing is the main part of my internship, it is not the only focus of my work. I am also given poetry podcasts to listen to and make notes on, broadening my experiences and knowledge of all that the poetry world contains. Another concentration of my internship is to read past Arsenic Lobster issues and other various poetry journals. This past week I sent in my first book review on one of these journals, and I plan to write at least two book reviews within my internship for publication. My first review was on Sara Tracey’s Some Kind of Shelter, which is a poetry journal. I chose this journal among the many I read because I was fascinated by Tracey’s ability to use mundane and everyday ideas and make them poetic and powerful to readers. Through my experience of writing this review I found myself drawn into the poem on the page and fully captured within the moment. The poetry felt vivid and alive through Tracey’s writing, and I am honored that I was able to write a published review of a journal that I truly enjoyed. Writing this book review was one of my favorite moments within my internship thus far. I am looking forward to writing my next book review and am currently in the process of reading more anthologies, researching poets, and trying to decide which poetry journal I am most drawn to.

This internship opportunity has taught me a lot already, and I am excited to expand on my knowledge and experiences. I find the internship to be a unique blessing. Not only do I get to learn more of the editing, writing, and publishing world by immersing myself in the poetry, but I also keep learning from my mentor at St. Thomas, the editor of the Arsenic Lobster, and each poet that sends in a submission to the journal. I look forward to learning about soliciting poetry for the journal, improving my writing skills, and learning more details about the poetry review process.

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Caitlin Morley is a junior majoring in English with an emphasis in Creative Writing and a minor in Communication and Journalism. She
has written articles published on the Odyssey Online and looks forward to a future working with people, literature, and the world of writing.