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LinkedIn

All MBAs, LinkedIn, Networking, Sales & Marketing, Social Media

Facebook – The New Job Board?

Last week Facebook announced its newest endeavor, recruiting.  The Social Jobs Partnership application was released, aggregating over 1.7 million openings from Work4 LabsBranchOutJobviteDirectEmployers and Monster.com.  This implementation allows the job search to be taken one step further by allowing users to apply directly through Facebook and instantly share the jobs to their social network.

Author J.J. Calao of Forbes says, “according to Facebook half of employers in the U.S. use the social network during their hiring process. Of those companies already using Facebook to engage with customers, 54 percent anticipate using it more heavily in their recruitment efforts in the future. Given those numbers, the lucrative nature of the recruitment industry and the success of companies like Work4 Labs—not to mention increasing pressure from battered shareholders—it appears likely that Facebook will seek monetize recruitment efforts at some point soon.”

While Facebook may be trying to monetize the recruiting front, it is well behind that of Linkedin, a professional networking site.  Linkedin allows seekers to market themselves professionally, while keeping their personal life separate, not the case with Facebook.  Linkedin also utilizes recruiting efforts directly from companies hiring for hundreds of positions, like that of Adobe.

“Today Adobe leases 70 Recruiter seats for their hiring efforts. A typical user is Trisha Colton, who leads Adobe’s hunt for digital media executives. On a recent afternoon she needed to fill five positions. With a few clicks of the mouse on her ThinkPad laptop, she could tailor a project-manager search that enabled her to look at possible candidates from 21 leading ad agencies, 15 publishing outfits and a host of other suitable backgrounds,” says George Anders, a contributor of Forbes.

LinkedIn enjoys a vast sweet spot between two extremes – low paying part time jobs, that will most likely be posted on Facebook and executive level positions- helping fill high-skill jobs that pay anywhere from $50,000 to $250,000 or more a year. (Anders, 2012)

While Facebook continues to evolve their utilization of social media networking, Linkedin has continued to be the juggernaut of professional networking and recruiting that is both effortlessly accessible and specialized to each members professional endeavors.

How has social media helped or hurt your career goals?  

Articles discussed:

Facebook Job Board is Here: Recruiting will Never Look The Same

How Linkedin Has Turned Your Resume into a Cash Machine

 

 

 

All MBAs, Interview, Job Search, LinkedIn

A Recruiter’s Guide to Job Seeking

Ever wanted to get inside a recruiter’s head?  What is he or she thinking when you are relaying past experiences and attempting to answer those behavioral interview questions succinctly with the right amount of detail and passion?  What do recruiters deem the greatest interview mistakes and how are they using social media these days?  These are a few of the questions that were posed to the recruiters from Target, Buffalo Wild Wings, Moneygram, Datacard and CMD Associates at the Recruiter Panel lunch event held by Graduate Business Career Services on March 6th.

 Jennifer Finkelson (Buffalo Wild Wings), Dana Schulz (Target), Stefanie Haglend (Moneygram), Twanda DeBorde (CMD Associates), and Julie Serlin (Datacard Group) spent an hour and half with the full time MBA students providing interview tips and answering  an array of student questions.  Here is a quick summary of the do’s and don’ts when it comes to applying and interviewing at these  top corporations.

 DO:

 Come Prepared:  Be ready with a list of questions for your interviewer that show an understanding of the company values, recent newsworthy events, and overall culture.  Make sure you have stories (2 minutes max) ready to share when behavioral interview questions are asked. The scenarios you share should include quantifiable results that had a broad impact on your overall job.

Show Passion, Be Energized, Come Curious:  Recruiters want to feel your excitement for the position.   Show them your interest through answering questions passionately with the appropriate level of enthusiasm.   Let your natural curiosity shine through with questions and an attitude that shows you are ready to learn and contribute.

Be Confident:  Confidence is portrayed through good eye contact, a firm (not death grip) handshake, and succinct to the point answers.  Be confident, but be yourself. 

Complete your LinkedIn Profile: Julie Serlin, from Datacard, remarked that she keeps LinkedIn open on her desktop throughout the day.  She refers to it repeatedly to source candidates or to ensure that resumes are consistent with LinkedIn profiles.  An incomplete profile is akin to  an incomplete brand.  Make sure you have a professional looking photo,  a detailed experience section with 2-3 bullets for each position held in  the past 10 years, and a least a few recommendations.

 DON’T:

 Ask a Transparent, Inappropriate Question:  “How long until I get promoted” does not show passion or interest in the current position.  It does, however, portray overconfidence and, quite frankly, doesn’t make you overly likable.

 Get Caught without Enough Questions:  This comes with preparation.  There really is no such thing as too much research when it comes to interviewing.  Familiarize yourself with the company website, read articles in Forbes, WSJ, and Inc. to get up-to-date on news worthy events relating to the company or its competitors.  All of this research proves useful when it comes to the point of the interview where the candidate can pose questions.  When you meet with several representatives at a company, it’s crucial to have curious, insightful, unique questions for each interviewer.  The only way to be ready for this is to research.

 As always be true to yourself, be polished, be prepared, and be passionate.  Approach each interview as an opportunity to learn and grow, and always do your best.  Even if you don’t land the position you are applying for, you will have made an impact on the recruiter and hiring committee.  You want to make that impact a positive one.

 

Career Tools, LinkedIn

2011 List of Words to Remove from your Profile

If you are like me and actively read the LinkedIn articles of the day, you have seen the 2011 list blah_blah_blahof most over used LinkedIn profile words.  While I appreciate this list and the insight I gained regarding what words or phrases to eliminate so to avoid sounding like everyone else, it is always helpful to have suggestions to replace the clichéd words.  This article from Opportunity Knocks.org provides useful suggestions to spruce up your LinkedIn profile with the main point being show what you have done by listing quantifiable accomplishments rather than summarizing your work with an overdone phrase.

Career Tools

INFOGRAPHIC: Here’s How To REALLY Use LinkedIn

LinkedIn guru, Lewis Howes gives practical and aesthetically pretty advice (just check out this LinkedIn Heartlink to understand what I mean) on how to better utilize this Social Media outlet.  This quick read gave me some pointers I wasn’t aware that I was neglecting.  I am eager to see if making the suggested changes such as customizing your URL and website (blogs, twitter accounts etc.) and adding your company (or school) profile will increase my viewer traffic.

Take a look and see if your LinkedIn profile is as up-to-date as it should be.

LinkedIn

The Art of Online Portraiture

When it comes to LinkedIn and other social media we tend to pay a lot of attention to the LinkediNcontent, how are we positioning ourselves etc, but did we ever focus our attention on the Profile picture?

LinkedIn research shows that a profile with display picture is seven times more likely to be viewed than one without. The author of this article on Wall Street Journal, Ms. Williams shares some dos and don’ts when it comes to fully defining who you are with a profile picture. Read more on WSJ>>